Network host name

I have configured my Yun on my network, but I cannot connect to my Yun using http://arduino.local. On my network it comes up as new-host.home using either wired or wireless network. I have version 1.5.3 of openwrt installed. How can I change the network host name?

Thanks,
Tom

tcrussell:
I have configured my Yun on my network, but I cannot connect to my Yun using http://arduino.local. On my network it comes up as new-host.home using either wired or wireless network. I have version 1.5.3 of openwrt installed. How can I change the network host name?

Thanks,
Tom

tcrussell,
The name http://arduino.local is when the Yun is working as a standalone Wifi AP (Access Point).

When you connect to your “home” wifi, that wifi router provides the IP number and the Name. If you want to connect to your “home” wifi and set the host name, that is a function of your wifi router (which the router may not have).

So, what is your goal in this message? To be clear, we may not be able to help you change your “host name”, since that is a function of your wifi router.

Jesse

Jesse,

I always knew that the router would provide the IP address, but I never realized that it also gives the name?

E.g. on my network I can access arduino.local. I cant imagine the router "magically" choose that name. So how does that work?

NewLine: Jesse,

I always knew that the router would provide the IP address, but I never realized that it also gives the name?

E.g. on my network I can access arduino.local. I cant imagine the router "magically" choose that name. So how does that work?

@NewLine, Well I don't have the brand name of the model, so I'm speculating based on the information.

The magical name (when in stand alone mode) comes into being via a relatively new protocol named Zeroconf. This protocol works kind of like an AP (Access Point), but instead of advertising services and a router - it just says, "Here I am. My name is XXX". It's that simple.

The name assigned via the third-party router has always been there. It's called Reverse DNS. This has been in place from just about the beginning of the internet.

So when you type a name into browser, it almost always does a DNS lookup. And DNS just exchanges domain names for IP numbers. On that, names are not particularly relevant, except for humans.

So in this case, it's quite likely the name gets sent to the router (which has handles the local DNS) and any protocol using the domain name simple gets an IP number, and that is what really happens under the hood.

I hope that's clear Jesse

NewLine: E.g. on my network I can access arduino.local. I cant imagine the router "magically" choose that name. So how does that work?

The Yun uses zeroconf (aka Bonjour) regardless of whether it is acting as an access point or client. It does this by sending out broadcasts with the arduino.local name (or whatever.local depending on the name you gave it on the Yun's configuration pages.) The catch is that being broadcast messages, they are generally only visible on that particular network segment: the broadcasts typically do not cross a wireless/wired boundary, nor do they pass through a router. So, unless the Yun and PC are on the same segment of the same network medium, odds are that the arduino.local name won't work.

This is what I suspect is happening with the OP: something in the network topology is preventing the broadcast from getting to the PC, or there is no Bonjour client active on the PC. (For example, out of the box a Windows PC does not support zeroconf, but if iTunes is installed, it includes Bonjour, so that will make it work.)

I suspect that the OP's router is assigning an additional name, but I believe that is in addition to, not instead of, the Yun's local name.

I do not know about Windows. But, with my Linux systems, I use /etc/hosts to define the names for my yun. I use static IP addresses for the machines that always on the network. I also use DCHP for the various mobile devices that walk in my house. This helps alot. I have both gregyun.local and arduino.local defined for the same IP address. This a good solution for me since, I do not have Bonjour service. I hope this helps.

tcrussell, I hope we've been clear. Certainly, ShapeShifter's explanation is a bit deeper than mine (and likely clearly). You have quite a bit of information. Hopefully not overwhelming. ;)

Jesse