New to everything. Simple question about Resistors in my Arduino kit

Hi I am new to everything that has to do with Arduino and electronics.

I bought the Arduino starter kit, and have completed project 1 , but i have a question about the pack of resistors the kit came with.

1.) I noticed that the resistors have really long straight legs which I found odd because would it not be easier if they came bent already to be able to fit in the breadboard more easily ?

2.) So I assume I have to bend the resistor legs myself, so they fit in the breadboard holes, but how do I know that the resistor is actually correctly in the breadboard ? because the legs are so long and all the pictures in the project book show the resistor completely 100 percent in the breadboard with no legs showing ? When I put the resistor in , I do not hear or feel any 'click' to make me know that it is in properly , and the legs itself seem way to unnecessarily long ?

The legs are long because they are stock resistors. It would be expensive to get resistors pre-bent and with custom length leads. Besides, what length? Sometimes that length is might convenient in terms of saving you a wire. Cut them to length and bend them yourself.

As long as the pin is fully inserted, it doesn't matter if part of it is exposed because the pin is longer than the depth of the holes in the breadboard

Being sure that a connection to a breadboard is making good contact is tricky. I don't use breadboard for that reason - I solder everything onto protoboard, and the time I save debugging loose wires pays for the components I don't reuse. Of course, since I sell protoboard, I get it a little cheaper.

Every time anyone shows me something they made on breadboard, it takes them like ten minutes to find the loose connections (while I make fun of them).

That's the way resistors are manufactured & sold. The legs are normally cut to fit, but for temporary-experimental-breadboard use you may want to leave them long.

You can cut them if you wish but I recommend that you only do that if you have some extras (of the same resistance value) in case you need longer leads for your next project.

I don't use breadboard for that reason - I solder everything onto protoboard, and the time I save debugging loose wires pays for the components I don't reuse. Of course, since I sell protoboard, I get it a little cheaper.

Every time anyone shows me something they made on breadboard, it takes them like ten minutes to find the loose connections (while I make fun of them).

I've built a few permanent projects on breadboards and they worked for several years. Two of those projects were used in cars.

So I assume I have to bend the resistor legs myself,

Yes I know it is difficult so why not get one of these:-

would it not be easier if they came bent already to be able to fit in the breadboard more easily ?

I think you are missing the point that resistors predate solderless bread boards by over fifty years.

but how do I know that the resistor is actually correctly in the breadboard

You don't. :stuck_out_tongue_closed_eyes:
Despite what some people might say they are total crap and should never be used.

We are getting an increasing number of posts like this. Total beginner thinking electronics has been designed as a hobby vehicle just for them. Where as in truth hobby electronics rides on the back of a vast industry and as such gets good prices, way lower than if the components were made just for this very small hobby market.

Why are resistor legs long? - So that they can be connected where you want them to be connected.

I thought that they were long so that the automatic machines that load resistors on reels are able to cut the legs off the reel and then still have enough length to grip and bend and insert into the board. A PCB designed for production assembly would never be designed with a resistor footprint that wasn't the smallest possible for the resistor body plus one standard bend radius on the legs.

The length of resistor leads predates PCBs they were designed for the tag board construction of early valve radios.

Automatic insertion is normally followed by a combined cut and crimp operation which was done by hand. These days surface mount allows a fully automatic system.

Quite agree with DrAzzy - I wouldn't trust those breadboards as far as I could throw one.

I've made loads of gadgets on 'veroboard' - solder's much better.

regards

Allan

Leave the legs long while you're prototyping or just learning through projects that you'll disassemble anyway.
There is no shame in using breadboard. You'll need to realize that the otherwise well-meaning folks here sometimes give absurd advice due to ignoring context.
No one should be telling a newbie to solder and desolder every project when a starter kit doesn't come with enough parts to make and keep whole every project.

I find there’s sometimes still glue on the lead ends from the bandolier(*), so often
chop off 6mm or so to avoid getting tacky glue in the breadboard (standard length
is longer than useful anyway).

Resistors in a kit may or may not already have the ends trimmed of course…

(*)

Thank you everyone for the awesome information. It answered all my questions.

What do I buy to trim the legs of some of the resistors for future projects, like whats the name of the cutting tool ? or is it just a simple pair of wire cutters and not a specific tool ?

It depends on what you want to do. Wire cutters will do, I have never used anything else, good ones can be expensive, these are the ones I use :-
lindstrom/ cutter ultra flush

However, you can get "wire crop" tools that go in from the back and cut the wire and add a small bend to stop it falling out.

You don't need any special tool to cut them. Wire cutters, scissors, nail clippers, whatever is fine.
You should start considering a soldering setup in your near future anyway, and just tinning resistor leads may give them the bit of grit and thickness you want for the extra peace of mind you seem to need.

Some component leads are tin-plated steel and will blunt normal scissors - wire cutters use hardened tool steel
blades and are designed for it. Ordinary scissors are not usually hardened.