NEWBIE needs help ^^

Hello everyone, good day.

I want to learn more about arduino. And before i start a project i would like to know somethings like what am i going to buy arduino UNO or leonardo? which is better?

Ive been reading and watching tutorials about arduino for about 2 weeks now. ive kinda love the idea and the problem is im new to it.

Im planning to make just a bluetooth controlled bot with two dc motor. Will that be much for someone newbie like me? by the way im planning to use L293D arduino motor shield.

Hope someone help me with this i would appreciate it.
Thanks Good day

My personal opinion is not to go for a Leonardo unless you need a micro that can declare itself as a mouse or keyboard to the PC. I have a Micro which is essentially a Leonardo in a different form factor, and it's a pita to use.

For starters, you can't go wrong with an Uno.

Uno, no question

JimboZA:
My personal opinion is not to go for a Leonardo unless you need a micro that can declare itself as a mouse or keyboard to the PC. I have a Micro which is essentially a Leonardo in a different form factor, and it's a pita to use.

For starters, you can't go wrong with an Uno.

Well does it has an effect or anything, or is it more difficult to use than the leonardo?whats the difference? cause i just found out that it is more cheaper than the uno :wink:

and in the coding part do they have difference?

In my opinion, the Micro / Leonardo is more difficult to use than the Uno.

Unless you need that HID functionality, go for a Uno.

The coding part has no difference with Arduinos.
As they told you before, Leonardo is tricky on installation, but the functionality is the same. I recommend you Uno because you can easily replace the microcontroller.

Lets be realistic... at some point you are going to realize how easy these are to use and want another one... just try a different type or form factor each time and see which one you like working with the best.

I find that the ones that fit into breadboards work best when prototyping and I just use a cheap UNO or PRO when making a final version of a project because it's usually cheaper and easier.

If there are "shields" available that contain additional functions which you expect to be valuable, then a UNO.

If you wish to use a solderless breadboard, then a Nano suits these; it is a more compact version of essentially the same.

If you are making a "final" application that does not require USB interface with the PC, then a Pro Mini is smaller again and the cheapest. You simply use a USB adaptor to program it and separate it from the adapter to use it on its own.

General recommendation is - buy a genuine Arduino UNO with which to get familiar, then a few (cheap) Nanos or Pro Minis (plus an adapter) to "throw around" and leave configured for various projects either temporarily or in fact, permanent applications.

The Pro Micro has a particular use for emulating a mouse or keyboard to interface to a PC. It also has more PWM (7) and analog input (12) pins (though three of these overlap).

mart256:
The coding part has no difference with Arduinos.
As they told you before, Leonardo is tricky on installation, but the functionality is the same. I recommend you Uno because you can easily replace the microcontroller.

mart256:
The coding part has no difference with Arduinos.
As they told you before, Leonardo is tricky on installation, but the functionality is the same. I recommend you Uno because you can easily replace the microcontroller.

so any codes that works for UNO can work with leonardo?

Yes.

If you want to prove to yourself that the UNO is the best choice, just Google "arduino projects examples "
and 95% of ALL the links will be UNO projects with UNO code and UNO pin numbers.
Of the 5% that aren’t UNO projects, 4% will probably be Mega2560 projects and the other 1% will be a combination of different other arduinos, as well as ATmega328 STANDALONE projects and ATtiny85 projects. The ATmega328 chip is available with a factory installed bootloader from DIPMICRO for $5, but you need an FTDI board to upload sketches (and you need to install the USB driver for the FTDI bd.

For numerous obvious reasons , it is not a good idea for a newbie to start out by breadboarding an ATmega328 standalone circuit (see attached photo) , but it can’t hurt to know the advantages of being able to do it. For one thing, since they are so cheap, it is very inexpensive to build multiple arduino circuits since everything else is the same with the exception that you would need an FTDI breakout for any arduino circuit that requires serial input or output. I substitute LCD displays for the serial output
but I still need the FTDI for the serial input. ATtiny85 chips are about $1.50 and have analog and digital I/O including PWM pins and two 8-bit timers. Why would you want to know any of this ? Well if you do as recommended and buy an UNO, you can use the UNO to upload sketches to the chip. The ZIFF SOCKET idea is pretty cool too and for $13 it’s great deal.

I’m not going to say any more about this for fear of being scolded by my colleagues for throwing you into the DEEP end.

Good luck.

Oh that circuit is wrong in just so many ways. Don't get me started...

raschemmel:
Of the 5% that aren't UNO projects, 4% will probably be Mega2560 projects and the other 1% will be a
For numerous obvious reasons , it is not a good idea for a newbie to start out by breadboarding an

I'm not going to say any more about this for fear of being scolded by my colleagues for throwing you into the DEEP end.

Good luck.

Im not that good at hardware stuff so i will not dig that deep hehe :slight_smile: there shields for those things right?

cejans:
arduino UNO or leonardo? which is better?

What is better, a cat or a dog? A cat is easier. I would get a cat.

For your first Arduino, get a Uno.

What is better, an apple or an orange? Hey, they are both fruit.

Oh that circuit is wrong in just so many ways. Don’t get me started…

That circuit works perfectly. The purpose of that setup was to test the S/W, not the radio range, which I already tested with a different setup using a battery powered transmitter breadboard that I could carry around. The dual ATmega328s on separate breadboards are for testing sketches that involve data acquisition and communication between two uP. There is nothing wrong with the circuit wiring, layout, or the components.

If you have something to say, say it, don’t imply you have something to say and then not say it because you are simply wasting everyone’s time. I don’t know what you point is but you missed mine, which was simply to show two breadboarded 328 standalone circuits.

NOTE: The attached photos are of the same two 328s being used to test RS-485 S/W using LT1481 chips.
The circuit was also used to test MAX485 breakout modules.
(The UNO is part of an H-BRIDGE motor driver circuit in front of the breadboards and is unrelated to the RS-485 circuits).