NodeMcu "migrate" to esp8266

Hi all,

I have a little project that I run on a mcu board. Basically is a simple web server that monitor 2 digital pins.
My question is if possible to make it run directly on a esp8266 board (same like in photo) and not use mcu board.
I want this because is smaller

Can you give me some hints on how to achieve that?

Thanks

esp.jpg

nodemcu.jpg

Google for “ESP8266 barebones”
Also the Wemos Mini D1 is significantly smaller than the Node MCU and will be easier to use that the raw ESP module. But, in principle a raw module can be used if you respect the appropriate pin pull up/down states for loading the sketch and for running it.

Very easy to do. Get an ESP12 module, add a few resistors and capacitors, and you're in business.

Also do read PieterP's ESP guide for how to do this exactly.

As 6v6gt says the ESP-01 (I assume that is what the picture is as it's not jpeg) is difficult to program over serial but by utilizing OTA programming in your sketch you may only need to do this once and from then on just program it over wifi.

This is a picture of my minimal-space ESP8266

ESP8266showingHeaderPins.png

…R

Robin2:
This is a picture of my minimal-space ESP8266

ESP8266showingHeaderPins.png

…R

That is small. On seeing it and checking, I now realise that you can get 2mm pitch header pins.

I also made a compact ESP module breakout with standard 0.1 inch headers for use on a breadboard / prototype board:

4.jpg

Nice and small but for prototyping I prefer to stick to the standard ESP breakout boards. Less work for me, and small enough for most purposes

Interestingly LoRa modules fit perfectly on the same boards, and with some effort RFM69 modules as well :slight_smile:

wvmarle: Nice and small but for prototyping I prefer to stick to the standard ESP breakout boards. Less work for me, and small enough for most purposes

Interestingly LoRa modules fit perfectly on the same boards, and with some effort RFM69 modules as well :-)

The major flaw with that ESP breakout is it's the full width of a single breadboard so you either need to span over 2 boards or put hookup wires under the board to bring them out where you can patch to them. Have they fixed the breakout problem of the regulator being wired the wrong way round?

I never used the on-board regulator spot, didn't realise it's wrong even! I normally power the device from my USB/TTL dongle (which has a regulator itself).

It is indeed irritating that it's so wide, could have been made smaller but then no space for the pin markings. I do like the two resistors on board, makes wiring one up easier.

Thanks a lot for all infos