Nokia 5110 Datsheet Help

I'm looking at the Nokia 5110 Datasheet and can't figure out how to read the instruction set. Can someone give me some guidance? I'm a bit confused on how to read it and how to convert it to the "#x##" format (Hexadecimal?) as seen in this video, at about 6:44. Any advice on how to read it and what numerical format he's converting it to?
Thanks in advance,
Digitalis

I think you will be better off ditching all that stuff and getting the PCD8544 library so that you can do what everybody else does. That way, you can have code like

lcd.print("tralala");

the sort of thing that everybody can understand. An example will be included with the library.

True, but I wanted to make my own library without dependencies.
I may consider this, but I still want to know how to read the datasheet for further knowlede.
Ditto with the format I don't recognize.

Look at page 22 of the datasheet, there is a display programming example. If you don't understand binary and hexadecimal, you are way over your head trying to understand the datasheet and you are certain to remain baffled.

This forum really isn't a good place to learn those fundamentals.

So that format IS hexadecimal?
Also, I DO understand binary, to clarify.
0010 = 2
1000 = 8
1010 = 10
etc.

I was asking how to properly read the datasheet. Is there some kind of tutorial on "reading oddly layed-out instruction sets" online?

Digitalis:
So that format IS hexadecimal?
Also, I DO understand binary, to clarify.
0010 = 2
1000 = 8
1010 = 10
etc.

I was asking how to properly read the datasheet. Is there some kind of tutorial on "reading oddly layed-out instruction sets" online?

Seriously? :slight_smile: It wouldn't look so odd to you if you just learned more. The key is simply learning. There are plenty of online resources on programming and electronics.

For example, you could take the simple step of reading the documentation that comes with the IDE, and is duplicated on this website under the "learning" tab. It will teach you about hexadecimal.

The display command set is for a machine to read, not you. They try to keep the logic as low level as possible, to reduce complexity and increase efficiency on the chip.

That is why libraries exist, to make the job of programming easier. So use one. It's fine to aspire to writing your own, but it is obviously beyond you without gaining some programming experience. Tackle some jobs you can actually complete first.

aarg:
Seriously? :slight_smile: It wouldn't look so odd to you if you just learned more. The key is simply learning. There are plenty of online resources on programming and electronics.

For example, you could take the simple step of reading the documentation that comes with the IDE, and is duplicated on this website under the "learning" tab. It will teach you about hexadecimal.
Integer Constants - Arduino Reference

The display command set is for a machine to read, not you. They try to keep the logic as low level as possible, to reduce complexity and increase efficiency on the chip.

That is why libraries exist, to make the job of programming easier. So use one. It's fine to aspire to writing your own, but it is obviously beyond you without gaining some programming experience. Tackle some jobs you can actually complete first.

Thanks for the advice! I'll look at that tutorial.
I I get how to read the datasheet, but I'll still look at the hex tutorial for sure.