Nooby question on wiring

I have a project (my first) that uses an Arduino as a 433MHz transmitter. The arduino is driven through USB by a Raspberry Pi running Homebridge. Everything is working fine, so I am thinking about how the permanent version is wired. I am using a simple breadboard right now. The Dupont wires have almost 2 cm long plastic "handle" that won't fit inside the case. With the case on there is maybe 5-8 mm of room between header and case.

I have seen one suggestion to use "pin headers" and then solder wire to the short side of the pin header. The only other possibility that occurs to me is to solder the connections to the pins on the underside of the arduino.

Is there another way? What is most likely to be reliable over the long term?

Thanks.

You don't say which Arduino board, but let's assume the Uno?
I solder my permanent connections where possible (I wish the Arduino boards were available without the header pins installed).

Many of the Arduino boards Are available without header pins. You just need to look a little deeper.

How are you connecting the Pi to the Arduino?
This is an older Pi, we're using one now on a Pi4

AFAIK Arduino Nano is commonly sold without pins on eBay/AliExpress. It is physically much smaller than Uno but otherwise same.

You can use 0.6--0.7mm single-strand hookup wires instead of pre-made dupont wires, then they can be bent
how you like, however its not the most permanent approach. Standard dupont pins are 0.7mm diameter, anything larger might not fit, less than 0.6mm will not grip enough for a solid connection.

Another approach is to get some strips of 90-degree angle dupont pins, and solder wires onto them (which is fiddly).

Thanks. I've ordered some right angle pins.

And yes, it's an Arduino Uno.

CrossRoads:
How are you connecting the Pi to the Arduino?
This is an older Pi, we're using one now on a Pi4

Is there an Arduino that would mount directly to the Raspberry Pi? I am connecting them with a USB cable, partly because it was really easy to figure out the serial connection using USB. If there is a direct mount and a serial connection using pins directly that would be nice packaging. But aren't the R Pi and Arduino on different voltages? Is that a problem?

Thanks

rjcarlson49:
Is there an Arduino that would mount directly to the Raspberry Pi? I am connecting them with a USB cable, partly because it was really easy to figure out the serial connection using USB. If there is a direct mount and a serial connection using pins directly that would be nice packaging. But aren't the R Pi and Arduino on different voltages? Is that a problem?

Thanks

Not that I've ever seen. Nor have I ever seen a need for it. Why do you need both?

SteveMann:
Not that I've ever seen. Nor have I ever seen a need for it. Why do you need both?

The Arduino drives a 433MHz transmitter in operating in an On Off Keying protocol, imitating an RF remote. The RPi is running Homebridge, a complicated Linux package that connects devices to Apple's Homekit. Driving the 433 MHz transmitter is CPU intensive, so all of that is offloaded to the Arduino.

My Arduino code accepts a string that encodes the signals to be sent compactly. The code also accepts a string that configures the exact nature of the OOK codes being sent. These vary a lot from remote to remote. I understand that the RPi and the 433Mhz transmitters have a voltage mismatch too. Arduino matches up properly.

I did not invent this split. I got the idea from various posts online. Some Arduino code called RCSwitch does something similar, but did not meet my needs and seemed difficult to use so I rolled my own.

RCSwitch is 2-way. It handles receiving 433MHz too. My target devices are receive only, so I did not need the ability to receive.

CrossRoads:
How are you connecting the Pi to the Arduino?
This is an older Pi, we're using one now on a Pi4

Hi,
Are you still offering your 96 screw terminal Mega shield?

Thanks

Does someone know how to make a backlight for a monitor with their own hands based on Arduino?
Because I trade forex time and I am deaf. I need to see visually when the ratings of currencies move up or down with the help of light

Nothing to do with an Arduino!

You need an application on your computer - whatever that is - to display your visual warnings on the monitor, nothing to do with the backlight at all. :astonished:

Mind you, an Arduino controlling a strip of WS2812 LEDs would make an eye-catching and visually descriptive indicator in conjunction with a "Stock-ticker" application which I suspect is available.

rjcarlson49:
The Dupont wires have almost 2 cm long plastic "handle" that won't fit inside the case. With the case on there is maybe 5-8 mm of room between header and case.

I have seen one suggestion to use "pin headers" and then solder wire to the short side of the pin header. The only other possibility that occurs to me is to solder the connections to the pins on the underside of the arduino.

Right-angle pin headers will give the best clearance - use shrink-wrap tubing over the solder joints
to insulate them, or you can use hot-melt-glue to encase the soldering and make a primitive
strain-relieved housing (not pretty, does the job).