Not to damage arduino

Hello. I want to control 400kV generator with arduino. Can it harm the board?

If you drop the generator on the Arduino, it could wreck it.

I don't mean that. I mean, the generator has two input wires - positive and negative. I want to know if i can connect positive to for example digital pin 2 and negative to ground and control it in this way.
I have just seen this video -How to use High Power Led with Arduino/low voltage signal. - YouTube. Can i use this principle?

I mean, the generator has two input wires -

And the specification of the interface is . . . ?

It's a simple generator. It uses 3-6 volts to generate high voltage and amperage - 2-5A

Please see reply #3.

The specification of what?

gio12381:
The specification of what?

The "simple generator". Seems obvious to me.

That link is for driving high power LED’s ; a different thing altogether .
What are you really wanting to do ?

I wrote it in reply #4. https://www.amazon.com/Boost-Power-Module-Voltage-Generator/dp/B01GM9B4R0 like it

gio12381:
I wrote it in reply #4.

Nope. That's why I asked.

hammy:
That link is for driving high power LED’s ; a different thing altogether .
What are you really wanting to do ?

I just want to work this generator for seconds with pish switch. That’s all. I don’t want to damage arduino during experiment

gio12381:
I wrote it in reply #4. Amazon.com : DC Boost Step Up Power Module High Voltage Generator DC 3V-6V, 700KV : Electronics like it

Note that the 2-5A is the input current at 3-6V it is NOT the output current which will be tiny.

You will certainly damage an Arduino trying to get 2-5A from any pin. But then I'm not sure where an Arduino comes in. If you just want to test it connect 5V through a switch and push the switch.

Steve

If you put a switching element (e.g. a transistor or a relay) that is controlled by the Arduino and switches power to the converter, you shouldn't have any issues assuming it's wired and used properly.

Do you have any experience with high-voltage electronics?

Blackfin:
If you put a switching element (e.g. a transistor or a relay)

And now the OP has another question about how to hook up the relay :wink:

Without even clicking the link (sorry, copy/pasting because OP was too lazy to make it a link), anyone here ought to know exactly what he's talking about - they're those black cylinders that generate "400kV" or whatever from batteries, generally used for making big sparks. Those are Chinese volts. In air, it's something like 30kV per cm to get an arc (quick googling). If you play with one of those, you'll find that they do not give sparks anywhere near as long as you'd expect from the rated voltage - last time I played with one, IIRC I didn't even get an inch. I think they're normally used as igniters for fuel/air mixtures, like starting stoves/torches, and firing potato guns.

Use a MOSFET (or relay) to switch power to the zappy thing.

You may need to put shielding (conductive metal tied to ground) around the arduino, because those things radiate EMI like nobody's business, especially if you're using it to generate an arc, which is about the only thing anyone does with them.

Might also need a separate power supply - I could see the starting surge creating enough of a glitch on the power supply to the Arduino to reset it, and I'll bet they put a ton of noise on the power supply as well.

Be careful with those things. To say that they'll give you a nasty shock is an understatement.

DrAzzy:
sorry, copy/pasting because OP was too lazy to make it a link

It's actually mark with a mouse drag, right click and "Open in new tab".