Not Using WireWrap Anymore?

Hi: My experience of almost 40 years ago would lead me to look for wirewrapping tools, wire, and perfboard. I don't think that it is done that way anymore. In any case, I've purchased the Mosfet, the capacitor, resistors, and a diode bridge in order to build the circuit in the video shown via the link on youtube. It is a clever AC light dimmer using PWM. In addition to the components I bought a perfboard with spacing that does not accommodate the Mosfet. Can you provide me with good prototyping guidance so that I do not ruin my ICs? My goal is to be able to do some PID control with the UNO. This project by Jaroslav Hruskovic. I apologize for not being able to put the accent marks on the name.

In any case, I'm seeking advice how best to put this circuit together.

Thanks.

Bob

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XdCvJ1wZ0bA

I do not understand how you would connect to “…the Mosfet, the capacitor, resistors, and a diode bridge…” using wirewrap. I do not know what country you are in, but in my country (the United States of America), wirewrap is not as popular as it once was. I use insulated wire, solder, and sometimes shrink sleeving.

I was a lot better at wirewrapping than I was at soldering. I was never good at soldering, and now that my hands are more shaky, my soldering is even worse. A PWB, soldering paste and an oven may be the way to go, but not very good for a single-use project. I hope that you get other advice; I am interested myself to see what is suggested.

There were ic sockets with long posts, the resistors and capacitors had their own posts. I don't know how we would have connected to the mosfet. Maybe the posts that had receptors on the other end for holding components for "sodering." I'm not sure about much the old techniques. Thanks much for your response!

I think Crossroads uses wire wrap quite a bit.

Wire wrapping is still done and effective.

Post 47 and 48 discuss point to point wiring on proto boards, see the PDF in post 48

http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=445951.msg3093342#msg3093342

.

Which IGBT did you purchase?

Wire wrapping is still a very good way to put together a prototype as long as you are using thru hole parts. IC sockets with wrap tails are still available as well as component pins, headers, and connectors. Check the DigiKey catalog( 1-800-344-4539 ) for all of the above as well as WW tools and wire. I have successfully used T-44 WW pins to mount discrete and odd components for wrapping. If I were building a circuit controlling any type of line connections, I would keep the 120 VAC stuff separated from all of the logic level ( low voltage ) stuff !! And use a minimum of # 14 AWG wire from your MOSFET to the outside world ( light or whatever ). Hope this helps !! By the way, I have been wire-wrapping since the early 70's and still use the same gun, bit, and sleeve made by Gardner-Denver !!! Like me, IT'S OLD BUT STILL WORKS !!!! Tom

StAugustine:
There were ic sockets with long posts, the resistors and capacitors had their own posts. I don’t know how we would have connected to the mosfet. Maybe the posts that had receptors on the other end for holding components for “sodering.” I’m not sure about much the old techniques. Thanks much for your response!

Wirewrap fell out of favour when logic got faster and controlled-impedance traces were needed. It used
to be used for bespoke complex logic systems as the reliability was excellent (a proper wire-wrap joint
onto a gold-plated post forms a gas-tight cold weld). I believe there were automated wire-wrap machines
for production too.

The mosfet was the IRG4PC50WPbF. Thanks much for all responses. Very useful. Bob

I use prototyping board, and solder everything - I have a variety of versions of protoboard that I've had made, some with pads for SMD parts if that's what you need to do, others with all through-holes.

I had these made custom, but I sell them now so you all can benefit (and so can I, ofc - $$$)

Thanks DrAzzy. I had to look up SMD but pleased that I did. Things do change with time for the better. Thanks again. Will try soldering the components.

One of the big problems with wirewrap is when you make a mistake and have to unwrap a pin (or two actually - sometimes more depending on which level the ends are) you can break off that little end of the wire that was wrapped and the stupid thing will drop down where it can cause no end of trouble between a couple of pins (ask me how I know about that from 30 years ago !! ) I still use wirewrap sometimes for simple stuff - I have a squeeze grip Gardner Denver wire wrap gun that works quite well.

And I remember hating close-up working with a big wire-wrap board - all those sharp points trigger my "keep your eyes shut" reflex somewhat - an uncomfortable feeling (perhaps not quite as bad as face-down on a bed-of-nails, but similar I think(*))

  • When lying on a bed-of-nails, remember not to put your hand down on the nails :)

MarkT: And I remember hating close-up working with a big wire-wrap board - all those sharp points trigger my "keep your eyes shut" reflex somewhat - an uncomfortable feeling (perhaps not quite as bad as face-down on a bed-of-nails, but similar I think(*))

  • When lying on a bed-of-nails, remember not to put your hand down on the nails :)

One guy I worked with was carrying a wirewrap board and walked into a door with the hand carrying the board expecting the door to open (it was to the lab). For some reason the door was latched and he ended up with about 100 or so small perforations in his hand from the ends of the wire wrap pins. Everybody except him thought it was funny :)

Wirewrap was also great for MSI when most of the connections were chip to chip. Now that you have one chip and a handful of glue components, it is not so convenient.

Oven or skillet soldering SMD components on a modern PCB with proper soldermask is literal magic. You heat it up, shout the magic word and all the components that were randomly oriented line themselves up exactly on their pads.

MorganS: Oven or skillet soldering SMD components on a modern PCB with proper soldermask is literal magic. You heat it up, shout the magic word and all the components that were randomly oriented line themselves up exactly on their pads.

Yes, until the magic words come out of your wife "WHAT'S THAT SMELL!!!! WHAT ARE YOU DOING TO MY PAN???!!!"

I still wirewrap projects. I picked up socket strips, rolls of wirewrap wire, and tools here http://www.king-cart.com/phoenixent/category=SOCKETS+WIRE+WRAP+DIP+%2526+SIP I've used a gold wirewrap tool since college, way back in 1981. I wrapped up a 1-chip project this weekend even, use a cd74HC4050 as a camera clock buffer at 20 KHz with a battery pack.

I think its mainly about time and cost now, back when we wire wrapped we couldn't just CAD up a PSB in 30 minutes, upload it, pay $5 and have it delivered in a couple days. We would spend those couple days wire wrapping up a perfboard and have the ability to unwrap and fix mistakes if needed.

its mainly about time and cost now

Indeed. Tools, Wire, and Sockets have all gone up in price, while chip prices have come down. Crossroads' source is pretty good - a lot of places are ridiculous (even the "hobby" suppliers.)