nRF24L01+ w/ external antenna: need separate 3.3VDC regulator, or use 5VDC?

Hello,
I'm confused about the nRF24L01+ with amplifier and separate external antenna. Does it have an internal 3.3VDC regulator, or do I need to supply one myself? The Nordic Semiconductor datasheet saids the nRF24L01+ can take 5VDC, but multiple places say you need a separate 3.3VDC for it.

The datasheet saids:

Absolute maximum ratings:
Supply voltage (VDD) =3.6V
Input Voltage (Vi) = 5.25V

What's the difference between VDD and Vi? Can I use the 5V power from the Arduino to power the nRF24L01+?

This website:
http://arduino-info.wikispaces.com/Nrf24L01-2.4GHz-HowTo

NOTE: These units VCC connection must go to 3.3V not 5.0V, although the Arduino itself may run at 5.0V and the signals will be OK. The NRF24L01+ IC is a 3.3V device, but its I/O pins are 5 V tolerant , which makes it easier to interface to Arduino/YourDuino.
Arduino UNO and earlier versions have a 3.3V output that can run the low-power version of these modules (See Power Problems at the top of this page!), but the high-power versions must have a separate 3.3V supply.

But this thread:

That unit has a built-in regulator, so you can use 5V for the supply no problem. ?Also, the inputs are 5V tolerant.

What I found was:

NOTE: These units VCC connection must go to 3.3V not 5.0V, although the Arduino itself may run at 5.0V and the signals will be OK. The NRF24L01+ IC is a 3.3V device, but its I/O pins are 5 V tolerant , which makes it easier to interface to Arduino/YourDuino.

What you quoted was in the comments section, in reference to a -different- board, this one:

Wow! The one with a built-in regulator is 10x the price!

The I/O pins are 5V tolerant but it needs a 3.3V power supply.

Thanks all. I see now, some nRF24L01+ w/ the power amplifiers don't have a regulator built in, some do. I brought my nRF24L01+ on the cheap, it was only $7. So no regulator. Now I guess I have to spend a few more bucks and wait longer for the regulators.

There's a bunch of them on ebay. I think I need something with at least 115mA at 3.3V. I'm confused about the packaging type. The TO220 packages look like they have fat pins that won't fit on my breadboard. Am I looking at it right?

These look fat:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/10x-Linear-Voltage-Regulator-3-3V-800mA-LD1117V33-TO220-ST-DE3713-/370879394012?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item565a2270dc

These look like they'll fit, but only are good up to 100mA.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/10x-Voltage-Regulator-5V-100mA-78L05-TO92-DE2475/370879482564?rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.m1851&_trkparms=aid%3D222002%26algo%3DSIC.FIT%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D261%26meid%3D3009443637730731751%26pid%3D100005%26prg%3D1088%26rk%3D2%26rkt%3D5%26sd%3D220833238370%26

I guess if I'm doing low transmit rates, the 115mA spec isn't too big a worry.

When I use TO-220, I twist the leads 90 degrees so they go in easier.

I bought some of these awhile back:

10PCS/LOT AMS1117 4.5 7V turn 3.3V DC DC Step down Power Supply Module For Arduino Raspberry pi|dc-dc step down power|dc-dc step downdc-dc step down module - AliExpress. They come in handy with the nRF24's. I just with they'd install the pins down instead of up. Matches the pin spacings on breadboards and protoboards.