overcoming resistance of wires connecting sensors with arduino

I am working on a project that uses arduino mega and ethernet shield mounted ontop of it,

arduino mga is further connected to following sensors:

  1. Soil moisture sensor,
  2. Water level sensor,
  3. DS18b20 temperature sensor
  4. LDR light sensor,
    5, Rain sensoor
    then
    the soil moisture sensor detects soil drynes or damp, of soil is dry it turns on solenoid.

so earlier my around mega was placed outsude and wire length was not so much, now I have decided to put ardiono inside the house and take six wires from my mega kept in room to outside corridor near pot, for that I bout 4mtr length wire, and 1 mtr more for soil moisture, water level, LDR and Rain fall sensors ontop of 4mtr it becomes 5+ mtr wire, so today evening I decided to measure resistance coming from total wire length which turns out to 2.9 - 3.0 with on my digital multimeter 200Ohm . See attached picture, so I would assume the reading on digital multimeter is multiple of 200ohm which becomes 600 ohm.

so the question is , Is it negligible for all the sensors listed above? or
do I have to put some boost on the side of sensors so to compensate power loss due to resistance ?

I am not experienced this is the first arduino project I am doing combining all the tries I did for learning .
Please guide.

Screen Shot 2016-12-20 at 9.43.08 PM.png

On all the digital multimeters I have ever used, the dial setting is the MAXIMUM reading on that scale. So a reading of 2.9 - 3.0 on the 200 Ohm scale means 2.9 - 3.0 Ohms, which you can very likely ignore for sensor wires.

On some higher range scales, you have to multiply the reading by K (1 000) or M (1 000 000).

jremington: On all the digital multimeters I have ever used, the dial setting is the MAXIMUM reading on that scale. So a reading of 2.9 - 3.0 on the 200 Ohm scale means 2.9 - 3.0 Ohms, which you can very likely ignore for sensor wires.

On some higher range scales, you have to multiply the reading by K (1 000) or M (1 000 000).

I have attached image now , please see and tell ? do I have selected right number on knob ?

If you are unsure about what your meter is telling you, use it on something that you know the value of, like a 100 Ohm resistor.

Due_unto: If you are unsure about what your meter is telling you, use it on something that you know the value of, like a 100 Ohm resistor.

well i have tested that way, it seems correct, so I understand this much of resistance is negligible.