PLEASE HELP!! Trouble powering Arduino Due with Vin pin

Hello everyone,

Some college friends and myself are building a standalone 30W wind turbine and I am having trouble powering my arduino due with the Vin pin with my boost converter. Our generator output at cut-in speed is about 2.3V and I am trying to use an Yeeco 2.0V - 24.0V boost converter to turn on the arduino at the cut-in.

However, when I hook up the converter to the arduino, the output voltage is ALWAYS at 3.6V no matter what the input voltage is and the current is very high (about a 1V -> 300mA ratio). But when I disconnect the arduino the output voltage is 10.5V (which is what I need) and input voltage is where it was originally?? When I use a DC voltage supply I have to increase the current source to about 1A before I faintly see the "ON" light on the arduino. Also when using DC supply the inout voltage always falls to 1.6V unless if I increase the current. But I have seen the Due's current draw at 9V is about 120mA and at 12V its only 55mA? I at first thought the converter could not supply enough current but it can supply up to 2A!! To me it seems like an elementary (relatively speaking) issue but I just CAN'T figure out why this is happening

Please help! Changing the generator is not an option (unfortunately).

It sounds like something is taking current, what else is connected to the Due?

Does this happen with nothing else connected to the Due?

Are you sure the output voltage from your boost converter is clean, have you looked at it n an oscilloscope?

A photograph of your setup would help as would a schematic, along links to your devices.

This is the link to the converter.
http://www.yeecoconverter.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=145

Nothing else connected literally just connections from DC supply -> converter -> arduino. Even in this simple setup it is the same result. I have tried breadboarding all 3 to the same ground bus rather than +- potential pins still the same. I have a feeling there is something weird in the logic of the boost converter when arduino is plugged in?

Strange things can happen when you put a boost converter (external), a 5volt buck converter (Due), and a linear 3.3volt regulator (Due MCU) in series.
Both switching regulators probably have UVL (under voltage lockout). The Due has.
And likely high startup currents, that the generator might not be able to supply on startup.
I don't see this working without some sort of battery/charging system.
Leo..

Is there a way to disable those undervoltage lockouts in the Due? I know that it is unwise but we are kind of desperate

You could try extra capacitors on the output of your boost converter. Maybe a 470uF with a 0.1 uF ceramic across it.

bcm78:
Is there a way to disable those undervoltage lockouts in the Due?

No.

Converters have losses. Doubling output voltage more than doubles the required input current of that booster.
You stand a better chance by just connecting the generator to V-in (assuming voltages are within range of the Due). Maybe a fat capacitor (thousands of uF) can help bridge the startup current. Dunno.

Can't you use an Arduino that's less power-hungry?
8Mhz Arduinos can work from 1.8volt.
leo..

A few thoughts:

And there is a brownout detector. A brownout can trigger a Reset and by reading SUPC_SR register you can know the source of the Reset (page 287, Sam3x datasheet)

Hi,

How many volts is your turbine?

Can you post a diagram of your project please, so we can see how you are powering everything, including your wind turbine and batteries?

Thanks.. Tom... :slight_smile:

bcm78:
Hello everyone,

Some college friends and myself are building a standalone 30W wind turbine and I am having trouble powering my arduino due with the Vin pin with my boost converter. Our generator output at cut-in speed is about 2.3V and I am trying to use an Yeeco 2.0V - 24.0V boost converter to turn on the arduino at the cut-in.

However, when I hook up the converter to the arduino, the output voltage is ALWAYS at 3.6V no matter what the input voltage is and the current is very high (about a 1V -> 300mA ratio). But when I disconnect the arduino the output voltage is 10.5V (which is what I need) and input voltage is where it was originally?? When I use a DC voltage supply I have to increase the current source to about 1A before I faintly see the "ON" light on the arduino. Also when using DC supply the inout voltage always falls to 1.6V unless if I increase the current. But I have seen the Due's current draw at 9V is about 120mA and at 12V its only 55mA? I at first thought the converter could not supply enough current but it can supply up to 2A!! To me it seems like an elementary (relatively speaking) issue but I just CAN'T figure out why this is happening

Please help! Changing the generator is not an option (unfortunately).

First, let me offer a suggestion: Power the Due via, either the USB port, or via the 5V pin. Thus you bypass the onboard switching supply.

Topic #428302.0 -- Where discussed is use of 5V Out to power board

Next, a wind turbine generator's raw output is likely to be full of ripple (at a frequency determined by the turbine rotation) speed, right? If so, that could be a reason for odd behavior. Or, is there some sort of regulator in the turbine. BTW: when you say "generator", are you referring to the wind turbine? Or is "generator" something else? And if something else, is that a solid (i.e. well regulated) 2.3V? And, as the Turbine picks up speed, that 2.3V will increase, right? What is the maximum voltage? I.e. the voltage range?

And finally, your description of the problem is a bit confusing to me. When you say "when I hook up the converter to the arduino, the output voltage is ALWAYS at 3.6V", what output? The output of the Yeeco converter? Or, the 3.3V output on the Due? And, I'm not sure what you mean by 1V -> 300mA ratio. When you disconnect the Arduino, it's the output of the Yeeco Converter that goes to 10.5V, right...when the input to the converter is at, what, 2.3V? And, why is "10.5V", what you need? The Arduino Due has, at the VIN input, a range of 7V to 12V. Why isn't 7V the needed voltage (though, I suppose, that may not be the voltage the Due's SMPS is most efficient)? "and input voltage is where it was originally"...wait, when did the input voltage change? Do you mean input voltage was originally at 2.3V, and, when you connected the Veeco, it changed to some other voltage? What was the voltage it changed to when the Veeco was connected?

When I use a DC voltage supply I have to increase the current source to about 1A before I faintly see the "ON" light on the arduino.

That is strange...I wonder if you damaged the DC-to-DC converter on the Due? Do you have another Due that you can try powering with your "DC voltage supply", to see if the same thing happens? Also, as Wawa pointed out, this could be due to interaction between the two switch mode converters. Maybe a linear regulator following the Veeco -- a low dropout regulator, to minimize power loss -- will filter out noise that could be affecting the Due's regulator. [or, bypass the Due's regulator, all together, as I mentioned, above.

Also when using DC supply the inout voltage always falls to 1.6V unless if I increase the current.

I'm not sure what you mean by the "inout voltage". Do you mean the output voltage on your "DC voltage supply"?

but I have seen the Due's current draw at 9V is about 120mA and at 12V its only 55mA?

I don't have any experience with the quiescent power requirements of a Due, but the Switch mode supply on the other side of the Vin pin will make efficient use of power, so when the voltage goes up (at Vin), the current demand goes down, for an overall power demand that is somewhat equivalent (efficiency changes, and other sources of power loss (such as the 3.3V linear regulator) will cause deviations from an even power demand).

Sorry if this sounds snarky -- I in no way mean to be mean (couldn't resist :wink: ) -- just trying to help you, and all participating, get to the bottom of this ;D