Please tell me the approx voltage of this bo motor

The image is attached below

You cannot determine what the winding voltage is from a picture like that!

You can measure the winding resistance with a multimeter and compare to similar sized motors
of known voltage.

You can measure the motor rpm at various supply voltages and guess that the design rpm is around
8000 to 12000 for a motor of that size and thus figure out a likely nominal voltage (as well as determine
the motor constant).

Image from Original Post so we don’t have to download it. See this Image Guide

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…R

I have some motors like that. Try it with 3v or 6v.

...R

How do i use tat motor with l298 motor driver?

The usual way. Its a DC motor. There are instructions for driving motors with motor drivers
out there, many of them in fact. Try searching for "arduino L298 motor circuit" or some such.

I mean iam unable to determine the voltage of motor so which battery should i use?

A 6volt one

The motor is 6 volt one or i should use battery of 6 volts?

Anvay:
The motor is 6 volt one or i should use battery of 6 volts?

Have you consulted your brain about possible answers to that question?

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Robin2 ok. So the motor is of 6v. Then how many volts battery should i connect to the driver?

Anvay:
Robin2 ok. So the motor is of 6v. Then how many volts battery should i connect to the driver?

Why are you asking that question?

I was about to add to Reply #9 that maybe there is a question or a reason for uncertainty in your mind but you have not told us what it is so I don't know how to respond.

...R

Well L298's drop about 2V, so 8V seems ideal! Of course it depends whether you need the full rated speed
or not.

Can i use 9v instead of 8v? It wont damage the driver and motor right?

Not if you mean small 9V batteries, they can't power motors.

Anvay:
Can i use 9v instead of 8v? It wont damage the driver and motor right?

What damages a motor is too much current causing it to overheat (and let the smoke out). Higher voltages force more current through the motor coils.

If you use PWM for speed control (with analogWrite() ) then the amount of time when the current flows through the motor is reduced unless you are using high values (near to the max of 255) with analogWrite(). That means that you can power a low voltage motor with a higher voltage if you don't use high values with analogWrite(). The trick is to make sure the motor does not overheat.

In general when it is said that a motor is (say) a 6v motor that is just rough guidance. It will probably work fine with somewhat lower and higher voltages. The lower voltages will result in less torque and a lower top speed and the higher voltages will give more torque and a higher top speed at the risk of causing the motor to overheat. If you use PWM and limit the max analogWrite() value to prevent the motor overheating you could probably use 12v or 20v to power it.

Another thing that must be taken into account is the voltage range that is acceptable for the motor driver. Some motor drivers don't work at low voltages - I can't immediately see from the datasheet what is the minimum for the L298. Its max is 45v.

...R

Thank you