Plotting graph in Processing_Doubt

I am using Processing for first time so let me apologize for asking such a basic question.
I have build a simple capacitive sensor using the following code adapted from the arduino forums which works fine (I’ve commented the code section for multiple arrays for now)


#include <CapacitiveSensor.h>

/*

  • CapitiveSense Library Sketch
  • Uses a high value resistor e.g. 10M between send pin and receive pin
  • Resistor effects sensitivity, experiment with values, 50K - 50M. Larger resistor values yield larger sensor values.
  • Receive pin is the sensor pin - try different amounts of foil/metal on this pin
    */

CapacitiveSensor cs_4_2 = CapacitiveSensor(4,2); // 10M resistor between pins 4 & 2, pin 2 is sensor pin, add a wire and or foil if desired
/*
CapacitiveSensor cs_4_6 = CapacitiveSensor(4,6); // 10M resistor between pins 4 & 6, pin 6 is sensor pin, add a wire and or foil
CapacitiveSensor cs_4_8 = CapacitiveSensor(4,8); // 10M resistor between pins 4 & 8, pin 8 is sensor pin, add a wire and or foil
CapacitiveSensor cs_4_7 = CapacitiveSensor(4,7); // 10M resistor between pins 4 & 7, pin 7 is sensor pin, add a wire and or foil
*/
void setup()
{
cs_4_2.set_CS_AutocaL_Millis(0xFFFFFFFF); // turn off autocalibrate on channel 1 - just as an example
Serial.begin(9600);
}

void loop()
{
long start = millis();
long total1 = cs_4_2.capacitiveSensor(30);
/*
long total2 = cs_4_6.capacitiveSensor(30);
long total3 = cs_4_8.capacitiveSensor(30);
long total4 = cs_4_7.capacitiveSensor(30);
*/
Serial.print(millis() - start); // check on performance in milliseconds
Serial.print("\t");

Serial.println(total1); // print sensor output 1
Serial.print("\t");
/*
Serial.print(total2); // print sensor output 2
Serial.print("\t");
Serial.print(total3); // print sensor output 3
Serial.print("\t");
Serial.println(total4);
*/
delay(1000); // arbitrary delay to limit data to serial port
}


I found this processing code which says it should work for plotting a graph :
import processing.serial.*;

Serial myPort; // The serial port
int xPos = 1; // horizontal position of the graph

void setup () {
// set the window size:
size(400, 300);

// List all the available serial ports
println(Serial.list());
// I know that the first port in the serial list on my mac
// is always my Arduino, so I open Serial.list()[0].
// Open whatever port is the one you’re using.
myPort = new Serial(this, Serial.list()[0], 9600);
// don’t generate a serialEvent() unless you get a newline character:
myPort.bufferUntil(’\n’);
// set inital background:
background(0);
}
void draw () {
// everything happens in the serialEvent()
}

void serialEvent (Serial myPort) {
// get the ASCII string:
String inString = myPort.readStringUntil(’\n’);

if (inString != null) {
// trim off any whitespace:
inString = trim(inString);
// convert to an int and map to the screen height:
float inByte = float(inString);
inByte = map(inByte, 0, 1023, 0, height);

// draw the line:
stroke(127,34,255);
line(xPos, height, xPos, height - inByte);

// at the edge of the screen, go back to the beginning:
if (xPos >= width) {
xPos = 0;
background(0);
}
else {
// increment the horizontal position:
xPos++;
}
}
}

However, it is not working. My COM port is 3 so I tried putting [1] instead of [0] but it doesn’t work.I am using an Arduino Uno. Please help.

However, it is not working.

If I had a nickel for every lame "it isn't working" posted here, I'd be rich.

That Arduino code does something. What does it do? If you open the Serial Monitor, do you see the data that is supposedly send?

The Processing code does something. There are precious few debug prints, so its hard to imagine how you know what it is doing. print() and println() are wonderful tools.

I am getting change in values if I see in the serial monitor on Arduino. I want to plot the graph using Processing for those values instead of just seeing them as numbers on Serial monitor.

I am getting change in values if I see in the serial monitor on Arduino. I want to plot the graph using Processing for those values instead of just seeing them as numbers on Serial monitor.

What about this?

There are precious few debug prints, so its hard to imagine how you know what it is doing. print() and println() are wonderful tools.