power control

Gentlemen,
I need to switch power(110v/10amp) on/off based on information from sensors. I'd switch power maybe once in a few hours.

i came across this 3v relay (https://www.amazon.com/Driver-Module-optocouple-Arduino-Raspberry/dp/B01F1355D2). which seemed to fit the requirements.

But i'm still confused if the above can be ran from the arduino pins or i'd have to build the CB like stated here - Controllable Power Outlet - SparkFun Electronics ?
What is the proper (safe!) Approach?

I could not make much sense of the poor English used to describe the item at that Amazon URL. If you are switching 110V DC, then this is NOT the product to use. If you are switching 110V AC, then this MAY be the product to use.

This relay is rated to switch 10 A at 110 V AC, but I would assume that this is into a resistive load. A motor or an incandescent bulb could be a problem.

Furthermore, I could not locate information about what voltage should be used for Vcc.

The circuit board described in that article can do a job similar to the one available for sale from Amazon, but is stronger (but still not satisfactory for DC loads). Do you need the extra strength? I do not know because there is not sufficient information. I do not like guessing games.

Good Luck!

Google on power tail.
They are a fairly safe way to switch mains with low voltage signals.
In the UK we are not so fortunate.
Using commercialy available IR controlled sockets and hacking the IR works though.

vaj4088:
I could not make much sense of the poor English used to describe the item at that Amazon URL. If you are switching 110V DC, then this is NOT the product to use. If you are switching 110V AC, then this MAY be the product to use.

This relay is rated to switch 10 A at 110 V AC, but I would assume that this is into a resistive load. A motor or an incandescent bulb could be a problem.

Furthermore, I could not locate information about what voltage should be used for Vcc.

The circuit board described in that article can do a job similar to the one available for sale from Amazon, but is stronger (but still not satisfactory for DC loads). Do you need the extra strength? I do not know because there is not sufficient information. I do not like guessing games.

Good Luck!

I need to power minimum 600 W per outlet. So that's about 6-7 Amps X 110 VDC V AC. I think it would be safe(r) to make a requirement 110VAC x 10Amps. And then , as you pointed out, this particular relay is not a good choice.
I think this one will be better or this one

So do i still need to get the CB? in other words - i should not be pluging the arduino into the SSR directly?

Anytime you need a relay board for a high voltage application, you need to look at the back of the board. Make sure the relay pole and throws are well isolated from the control circuit and ground plane. Use this relay as a good reference.

Note: the U-shaped isolation slot around the pole of the relay. This helps prevent arcing between the high-voltage and the relay coil. Also note that the ground plane stops at the relay coil connections, And the wide separation between the high current traces for the relay to the connection block. Also note most of these relays are meant for prototyping. Not for continuous use. the copper may not be heavy enough to pull the full load that is marked on the relay. Although for low current applications, these relays should perform well. you can increase the current capabilities by removing the silkscreen, exposing the copper trace. Then applying a layer of solder from the relay contact point to the junction block. remember, you need your project to be safe as well as reliable.

promacjoe2:
Anytime you need a relay board for a high voltage application, you need to look at the back of the board. Make sure the relay pole and throws are well isolated from the control circuit and ground plane. Use this relay as a good reference.

https://www.amazon.com/GEREE-Channel-trigger-Optocoupler-Arduino/dp/B00TGUH99U/ref=sr_1_1?s=industrial&ie=UTF8&qid=1490677678&sr=1-1&keywords=GEREE+DC+5V+2+Channel+Relay+Module+High%2Flow+level+trigger+with+Optocoupler+for+Arduino

Note: the U-shaped isolation slot around the pole of the relay. This helps prevent arcing between the high-voltage and the relay coil. Also note that the ground plane stops at the relay coil connections, And the wide separation between the high current traces for the relay to the connection block. Also note most of these relays are meant for prototyping. Not for continuous use. the copper may not be heavy enough to pull the full load that is marked on the relay. Although for low current applications, these relays should perform well. you can increase the current capabilities by removing the silkscreen, exposing the copper trace. Then applying a layer of solder from the relay contact point to the junction block. remember, you need your project to be safe as well as reliable.

Thank you this is very helpful. What relay should i use for the production run then ? are any of the above ( from my reply earlier) any good ?

AZZ:
I need to power minimum 600 W per outlet. So that's about 6-7 Amps X 110 VDC. I think it would be safe(r) to make a requirement 110VAC x 10Amps. And then , as you pointed out, this particular relay is not a good choice.
I think this one will be better or this one

So i still need to get the CB? in other words - i should not be pluging the arduino into the SSR directly?

Neither of these SCR's will be any use for switching DC. They use DC to control the AC output. Switching DC is a completely different ball game to switching AC as there is no crossover point at 0V. DC Relays are rated at a lot lower than AC. You need a relay rated for DC and not AC

--
Mark

If the load is inductive (eg solenoid, motor) some protection circuitry would extend the relay contact life.

eg MOV, R-C snubber, flywheel diode.

What is the load?

Allan

MarkDerbyshire:
Neither of these SCR's will be any use for switching DC. They use DC to control the AC output. Switching DC is a completely different ball game to switching AC as there is no crossover point at 0V. DC Relays are rated at a lot lower than AC. You need a relay rated for DC and not AC

--
Mark

ohh! I'm so sorry. AC not DC. I made a big type off. Thought i proof read it. and yet :frowning:

I need to switch a regular 110 VAC line that feeds 600/1000 Watt load - home heater, LED lights and regular incandescent lights.

If you are planning on hardwiring everything, although not this particular one, this may be the best way to go,

https://www.amazon.com/Hoymk-Ssr-25da-Actually-24-480v-Single/dp/B00OPXLLGU/ref=sr_1_57?ie=UTF8&qid=1490718950&sr=8-57&keywords=Wi-Fi+relay

Bear in mind depending on the current, you may be required to have a heatsink.

Alternatively, you can use a radio controlled remote outlet/switch. They range from standard radio control, Bluetooth and Wi-Fi enabled outlets. You can control your entire house using this type of outlets/switches. They can be controlled by the Arduino/computer/cell phone. They are much safer than what you might come up with, and more compact. and best of all no wiring needed. The only downside to this type of outlet is security. Especially the Wi-Fi enabled. Although not very likely, you may find your lights flashing on and off. There are some that likes to see what they can do with other people's Wi-Fi systems. And others looking to disable your security system. Always use a good strong passphrase on your Wi-Fi.

promacjoe2:
If you are planning on hardwiring everything, although not this particular one, this may be the best way to go,

https://www.amazon.com/Hoymk-Ssr-25da-Actually-24-480v-Single/dp/B00OPXLLGU/ref=sr_1_57?ie=UTF8&qid=1490718950&sr=8-57&keywords=Wi-Fi+relay

Bear in mind depending on the current, you may be required to have a heatsink.

Alternatively, you can use a radio controlled remote outlet/switch. They range from standard radio control, Bluetooth and Wi-Fi enabled outlets.

Thank you.
The WIFI option looks interesting indeed.

I think the only remaining question i have left is if i need to use the CB to separate arduino and an SSR or not ?

after some reading i think the answers have been well formulated here :
http://www.scienceprog.com/considering-solid-state-relays-ssr-for-your-projects/

in short:
no need for CB if SSR used (as opposite to mechanical relay).
i need to take into account dissipating heat
i need to check the DS to insure the switching current doesn't drain the Arduino pins.
and i (prefer) to have the relay open (no current) when the management circle is down.

Why not buy a 3-pack of remote controlled power outlets.

The Arduino, with a $1.00 RF transmitter module, can generate the same signals as the remote control.

Those power outlets are also available in Wifi or BT.
Leo..

AZZ:
after some reading i think the answers have been well formulated here :
http://www.scienceprog.com/considering-solid-state-relays-ssr-for-your-projects/
http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=4390.15

in short:
no need for CB if SSR used (as opposite to mechanical relay).
i need to take into account dissipating heat
i need to check the DS to insure the switching current doesn't drain the Arduino pins.
and i (prefer) to have the relay open (no current) when the management circle is down.

When using RF, Bluetooth or Wi-Fi receivers, If the control circuit goes down, Any switch that is on may stay on. Any switch that is off will stay off. If you're using Wi-Fi, you do have another option. if you have a Wi-Fi connection, You can use your computer or your smart phone to shut down any receiver. In fact you can use an inexpensive smart phone/tablet to control the entire system. That includes multiple Arduinos.

Wawa:
Why not buy a 3-pack of remote controlled power outlets.

The Arduino, with a $1.00 RF transmitter module, can generate the same signals as the remote control.

Those power outlets are also available in Wifi or BT.
Leo..

hmmm. Something like this ?

Yes, something like that.
Safer than using relay boards.
Use a transmitter module for the Arduino with the same frequency (433.92Mhz for the one in the link).
Plenty of threads here to read/clone the code of the handheld transmitter that comes with the outlets.
Leo…

Wawa:
Yes, something like that.
Safer than using relay boards.
Use a transmitter module for the Arduino with the same frequency (433.92Mhz for the one in the link).
Plenty of threads here to read/clone the code of the handheld transmitter that comes with the outlets.
Leo..

this is very interesting... how would you recommend to go about the 5V vs 3.3 v problem?
I 've been thinking to use the esp3266 module to communicate to a main server (data logging), but with RF been 5V.. i'm not sure if ( or how) i can combine these two

Logic Level Shifter

--
Mark

Or for couple of dollars more, you can use something like this.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/ESP-12E-ESP8266-UART-WIFI-Wireless-Shield-Arduino-UNO-R3-/171981792137

The advantages are, you Don't have to worry about compatibility, logic shifters, or a rats nest of wires going everywhere, or making sure everything is plugged in correctly. You also Don't have to worry about accidentally disconnecting a wire or two while working on it, And then figuring out which wire goes where. it will also be more reliable.

al'right. thank you gentlemen. will put my orders in for RF based solution.