power custom PCB with 2xAA battery

Good day everyone,

I'm working on my first custom PCB: an led chaser (10 led SMD controled by a atmega328p SMD).
As this pcb will be placed inside a small die cast vehicle, I would like to know if my approach is good:

I want to use either 1xAA battery with a DC DC boost converter 1 to 5V, or 2xAA batteries with a 3 to 5V DC DC boot converter.

My question is:

Could my led animation run slower if only powered with 1xAA battery or is it just the battery life that could be affected ?

thanks.

Battery life will be very poor with 1xAA and a boost converter.

The ATmega will run fine on 2xAA, with no boost converter, and that will extend battery life. However, you need to select the internal 8 MHz clock.

Red, green and yellow LEDs can also be configured to run on 2xAA. Provide more details for better answers.

jremington:
Battery life will be very poor with 1xAA and a boost converter.

The ATmega will run fine on 2xAA, with no boost converter, and that will extend battery life. However, you need to select the internal 8 MHz clock.

Red, green and yellow LEDs can also be configured to run on 2xAA. Provide more details for better answers.

I'd be using either blue, red, amber or white LEDS.

So if i use 2xAA battery with a boost converter i can use a 16MHz clock ?

The allowed clock rate depends on the ATmega supply voltage. 16 MHz requires 4V or better.

Do remember that if your using 'AA' batteries that typically the non-rechargeables may start at 1.5V but will be down to 1.2V or less when halfway through their life.

So plan to have you project able to run on say, 2.4 or less, dont assume you have 3.0v.

jremington:
The allowed clock rate depends on the ATmega supply voltage. 16 MHz requires 4V or better.

srnet:
Do remember that if your using 'AA' batteries that typically the non-rechargeables may start at 1.5V but will be down to 1.2V or less when halfway through their life.

So plan to have you project able to run on say, 2.4 or less, dont assume you have 3.0v.

I understand ... so what would be my best option to power my PCB ? I obviously don't need much power since it's just 10 led SMD 0603 that needs to be turned on / off.

Eventualy using TP4056 with a 18650 li-on battery ?

Running the Atmega 328 at 8MHz also has the advantage of reducing its energy consumption. In all the projects I have created with Atmega chips I run them at 8MHz for the convenience of very few external components. I have built a few projects that are powered by a pair of AA alkaline cells.

...R

nordi:
I understand ... so what would be my best option to power my PCB ? I obviously don't need much power since it's just 10 led SMD 0603 that needs to be turned on / off.

That depends on the devices. If they are happy with operating in the 2.4V region then there is nothing wrong with using Alakalines.

If you need a bit more voltage there is the option of using the Lithium Energizers in AA or AAA. They will be at 1.5V for most of their life.

Or the NiZn re-chargeables, they are nominally 1.6V as apposed to NiMh which are 1.2V.