Power distribution

So, imagine I have a standard arduino board. I have a circuit that supplies power to an object as a separate component. Say I have 3 of those separate circuits. And say one requires medium power, one requires medium power, and one requires low power. But then say I press a button, and now that causes the first circuit to only get a little power, and the other two to get medium power.
Basically, how would I make a power distribution circuit with changing presets?

You clearly need to study up on Volts and Amps, perhaps research "Power Supply" on Wikipedia for a general discussion.

Now while you do that, do you have a specific situation that is concerning you? If so, please describe it in excruciating and unambiguous detail.

"And say one requires medium power, one requires medium power, and one requires low power. But then say I press a button, and now that causes the first circuit to only get a little power, and the other two to get medium power. "

Without knowing what the circuits are, I think of a refrigerator, an air conditioner, and an oxygen tent.

If that’s the case, I can see some problems.

Normally if a circuit requires power, you should make it available. It will normally not take more power than it needs.

What are you trying to do?

I would have thought it was an air conditioner, a refrigerator, and an oxygen tent in order, although if by "oxygen tent", you mean an oxygen concentrator then I suspect it may be fairly similar in power consumption to a refrigerator, possibly more.

I haven't looked at the nameplate on one, but we sometimes have to sign off on a concession form for the power company for patients using one.

I apologize for my EXTREMELY poor explanation. So imagine I have one battery. And I have 3 circuits, with a special type of motor at the end. So if I press a button, I want power to be distributed evenly to all of the motors (and imagine these motors aren't Arduino compatible). Say I press a seconds button, and now to power splits so that one motor gets 70% of the power from the battery, and the other two get 20% and 10%, respectively. How would I make a power splitter that varies how much of the battery power goes to different objects, based upon input?

To control power to motors, use appropriate motor controllers.
If your "objects" are not motors, what are they?

Here is a diagram that hopefully explains it better:

None of this make sense.
If you want to make one motor run faster then the rest that adds up.

Say you have 3 motors and you want to do this
1 motor runs at 70%
2 motor runs at 50%
3 motor runs at 20%
Then you get a supply that can run all 3 at 100% and then use pwm to set how fast each run using a transistor
for each motor and pwm to control how much each are on.
And don’t forget emf diodes for each motor.

If the "motors" really are incompatible with the Arduino, then I would think that you're wasting time asking on an Arduino forum.

The Adafruit Motor/Stepper/Servo Shield for Arduino is an easy way to control up to 4 motors with up to a 12v battery with up to 1.2A current.

So long as the details are kept secret, the answers will be completely ignorant of those details.

I think the situation is just too vague for anyone to offer any specific recommendations.

Hi,
What are the incompatible motors.
What do you want the incompatible motors to do on 100%, 30% and 20% "power".
What is the application?

POWER is a product of CURRENT and VOLTAGE.

What is your electronics, programming, arduino, hardware experience?

Tom.... :slight_smile:

If the "motors" really are incompatible

All motors are incompatible people you don't want to hook a motor to a arduino without a motor controller of some kind.
You need a

The Adafruit Motor/Stepper/Servo Shield for Arduino is an easy way to control up to 4 motors with up to a 12v battery with up to 1.2A current.

Or a simple transistor and a back emf diode to control a motor. Even small motors are way over 40 mA.

The OP is just using in his or her own words "incompatible motor" to ask how to drive a motor.