Power Distrubution board

Hello!

Im building a RC car with some added functionality and im stuck in the power distrubution part.

As you can see in the image below i want to power 2 Brushless motors with Electronic speed controllers (ESC's) A Raspberry pi2 with peripherals, 1-2 Arduinos , Servos, and small sensors...
And all this i want to be able to run on the same battery a 12 V battery.

So the motors can just get connected straight away with the ESC's but im gonna need to step down the voltage for the rest of the electronics to diffrent levels right? and how am i to do that in a neat way?

Please don't use Fritzing. A hand drawn sketch photographed with a phone is always better.

Some ESCs come with a BEC - a Battery Eliminator Circuit. This steps down the main power battery to a voltage appropriate for receivers and Arduinos. Otherwise Pololu make some great products.

*many fritzing diagrams -are- acceptable IMHO... (like the one above.. albeit way to small)

which would, more or less, be a colored version of a hand drawn one. (and cleaner)

(its just become trendy to complain about ALL of them)

those fritzing diagrams with lines/wires all over the place and bad components..etc.. are kaka though.

I cant see the diagram because its too small. :frowning:

As an experienced RC hobbyist , I can tell you the preferred approach is standalone BECs
because once you get more than one hobbyist in the same place at the same time, someone always wants to be the fastest and the next thing you know everyone is pushing their ESCs to the breaking point. Once the ESC fries then you can kiss you BEC goodbye, and if it's an aircraft , then you can kiss everything else goodbye. Better to use a standalone BEC. Besides, you must be new because everyone knows it's a bad idea to power a uController from the same power source driving motors, for several reasons, not the least of which is the current spikes , and noise on the unregulated input voltage.

MorganS:
Please don't use Fritzing. A hand drawn sketch photographed with a phone is always better.

Some ESCs come with a BEC - a Battery Eliminator Circuit. This steps down the main power battery to a voltage appropriate for receivers and Arduinos. Otherwise Pololu make some great products.

xl97:
*many fritzing diagrams -are- acceptable IMHO... (like the one above.. albeit way to small)

which would, more or less, be a colored version of a hand drawn one. (and cleaner)

(its just become trendy to complain about ALL of them)

those fritzing diagrams with lines/wires all over the place and bad components..etc.. are kaka though.

I cant see the diagram because its too small. :frowning:

Right click on the image and press show image.

Fritzing exports 10824 × 5721 images, this will be loaded if u choose to show the image and u might have to wait for it to load a bit becouse of it's size.

raschemmel:
As an experienced RC hobbyist , I can tell you the preferred approach is standalone BECs
because once you get more than one hobbyist in the same place at the same time, someone always wants to be the fastest and the next thing you know everyone is pushing their ESCs to the breaking point. Once the ESC fries then you can kiss you BEC goodbye, and if it's an aircraft , then you can kiss everything else goodbye. Better to use a standalone BEC. Besides, you must be new because everyone knows it's a bad idea to power a uController from the same power source driving motors, for several reasons, not the least of which is the current spikes , and noise on the unregulated input voltage.

Ah, this project is less focused on speed, and more to how much sensors and other hardware we can put on the platform, the reason for the question is that we currently have 2 power sources wich makes charging a hassle and therefor we want to have 1 thing to power the entire thing even if it takes a lot of soldering custom boards, but a one battery with a power dist board to supply many diffrent devices.

there will be a few arduinos, the raspberry, a lidar, a bunch of arduino powered sensors etc.

many fritzing diagrams -are- acceptable IMHO... (like the one above.. albeit way to small)

which would, more or less, be a colored version of a hand drawn one. (and cleaner)

(its just become trendy to complain about ALL of them)

those fritzing diagrams with lines/wires all over the place and bad components..etc.. are kaka though.

I cant see the diagram because its too small. :frowning:

I think you're missing the point. The main objection to Fritzing's here is that they are NOT schematics. A schematic has an IC symbol with all the pins labeled. Same for voltage regulators. The only labels a Fritzing has are silksceen labels on pcbs .
Fritzings suck because you have to trace the lines . With a schematic you look at the pin name and usually you can figure out where it connects at the other end.

raschemmel:
I think you're missing the point. The main objection to Fritzing's here is that they are NOT schematics. A schematic has an IC symbol with all the pins labeled. Same for voltage regulators. The only labels a Fritzing has are silksceen labels on pcbs .
Fritzings suck because you have to trace the lines . With a schematic you look at the pin name and usually you can figure out where it connects at the other end.

Maybe i didnt make it clear, the fritzing "schematic" is just to show all the red and blue lines going to one single board, to clarify that i wanted 1 power dist board to handle the convertion from the 12 V battery to the 5V the raspberry needs, the voltage the arduinos need, 6V as my stepper need and so forth in a smooth way. that was the actual question that got distracted by the fact that i used Fritzing as my to go "MS paint" to do fast mockup. As i do not know the solution to the problem.

Go to an art supply store and buy 11"x 17" sketch paper or get some printer paper that size and just draw a schematic with a pen and photograph it.

raschemmel:
I think you're missing the point. The main objection to Fritzing's here is that they are NOT schematics. A schematic has an IC symbol with all the pins labeled. Same for voltage regulators. The only labels a Fritzing has are silksceen labels on pcbs .
Fritzings suck because you have to trace the lines . With a schematic you look at the pin name and usually you can figure out where it connects at the other end.

ahh... well if your talking about a 'schematic' vs a 'wiring diagram'.. I 100% agree.

but it was just said to do a 'hand drawn sketch'.. in which case I feel a fritzing a diagram is better/equal to.