power supply for arduino nano

Hi,
I want to make a project using arduino nano and I want to make a simple circuit to supply it with power from 220-240v .
Could anyone help me.
Thanks.

1 Like

Buy a USB charger and you're the man (or woman) :wink:

Yeah, a generic 5V USB phone charger.

Ebay 5V 2A USB Adapter

And if you need to make it portable just get a USB power bank for about 10 bucks. But if you plan on getting a usb charger make sure to plug it into your usb port on the arduino since it is stated to supply it with 7-12 volts though the power jack (supplying the 5 or 6 volts through the usb port or your arduino is not harmful since it should be the same as if you were trying to power it from your computers USB port)
But it should work, i just tested it right now on my little Uno board and it seemed to work fine.

I will not use the USB plug because I will supply the arduino with power from VIN and GND pins ... I found this circuit at google but I'm not sure if it's work with arduino nano or not .
Thank you for reply.

I hope someone can help me.

That circuit would probably work OK, though I would add a 2A fuse in series on the AC input, and ground the transformer frame.

hsalame:
I will not use the USB plug because I will supply the arduino with power from VIN and GND pins ... I found this circuit at google but I'm not sure if it's work with arduino nano or not .
Thank you for reply.

With your experience in electronics, I would do this instead...

Take the 5V USB cable and strip it. Should have a 5V wire and a GND wire for you to place on the 5V and GND pins.

Both ideas .... USB 5V charger, or the scheme above are good choice.

Is better 9V input voltage, because Nano versions uses different types of stabilisers and some pieces burned .... after it was overvoltaged (12V and more).

Few days back I have created I2C thermostat with display 16x2 signs with blue backlight and this one consumpt 50mA with nano, and I2C extender P82B715, including LM35 sensor.

If you use a breadboard or any shield f.e. for servos ... it consumpt more current.

That transformer in the pic. I post is too big I want to use a transformer like that one inside the phone chargers because it's small.

hsalame:
That transformer in the pic. I post is too big I want to use a transformer like that one inside the phone chargers because it’s small.

Sorry, but I am still confused as to why you cant just get a 3A 5V phone charger? Will be safer, cheaper, smaller and less time consuming.

My project is to make a circuit inside the lamp switch box to control it with bluetooth I have draw the circuit includes the relay and pins for bluetooth and for arduino nano ... so I want to use a small power supply circuit to complete my circuit project .
Thanks a lot .

It still seems like using one of the ubiquitous 5V phone charges would work. Just find one with a nice stable 5V output and use its parts.

Do you have other components which require voltages higher than 5V?

I don't want the phone charger I just want a circuit which has a small components to supply my arduino nano with 9v Please could you help me with this issue .
Thanks.

hsalame:
That transformer in the pic. I post is too big I want to use a transformer like that one inside the phone chargers because it’s small.

Those transformer are part of a complicated high frequency switch-mode supply.
It’s not a mains transformer.

Be safe and use a cellphone charger.
Leo…

Just get a charger! Smaller isn't possible! And if the stupid plug is the problem, just crack the charger and use the bare PCB (but be sure to isolate everything properly inside the box). You can even solder on wires to the chargers USB socket and feed the 5V directly into the 5V/Vcc (notVin).

I don't have space to put the cellphone charger board ... I put that pic. to give you an idea how I want the circuit I just want a circuit like it but smaller because the transformer is too big in my pic. .

Then I'm sorry, that's not possible... A charger is about as small as you can get...

You may have noticed DC devices running off of AC supply have a "wall wart" either on the part that plugs into the wall or there's some sort of "brick" which holds the AC to DC regulator.

I don't think there's an easy way to convert AC to DC without some sort of bulky regulator.

How much current did you need?