Powering Arduino Uno with 5v pin

I have a string of 150 RGB LEDs (ws2812b) that I will be powering with a 5v, 10A power supply, like this.

I'll be controlling the LEDs with an Arduino UNO, and would like to power the Arduino off the same supply.

I have read that the 5v pin on the Arduino can be used for input power, but it needs to be exactly 5v since there's no protection circuitry on it. I tested the power supply with my multimeter and get 5.209v. Will I have any trouble, or should add a buck converter or something to aim for closer to 5v?

I have one other question... I was going to add a wall plate barrel jack to my enclosure to power both the LEDs and the Arduino, but most of what I see are rated for like 1A. Is that something I should worry about? Any suggestions would be appreciated.

I have read that the 5v pin on the Arduino can be used for input power, but it needs to be exactly 5v since there's no protection circuitry on it. I tested the power supply with my multimeter and get 5.209v. Will I have any trouble, or should add a buck converter or something to aim for closer to 5v?

That's OK. 5V is the "nominal" operating voltage. Nothing in the real world is perfect and there is always some tolerance. The ATmega datasheet says the "maximum operating voltage" is 6V. (The other chips on the board will also have some safety margin.) ...Your meter isn't perfect either.

I have one other question... I was going to add a wall plate barrel jack to my enclosure to power both the LEDs and the Arduino, but most of what I see are rated for like 1A.

You should look for a different kind of connector.

DVDdoug:
That's OK. 5V is the "nominal" operating voltage. Nothing in the real world is perfect and there is always some tolerance. The ATmega datasheet says the "maximum operating voltage" is 6V. (The other chips on the board will also have some safety margin.) ...Your meter isn't perfect either.
You should look for a different kind of connector.

Thanks, that's good to hear.

I'll keep looking for a connector.

This one looks promising. The product description says the rated load is 5A DC30V

I'm new at this, but that's 150 watts, correct? And my power supply is 10A 5V, so 50 watts, yes? 1/3 what the connector is rated for.

The circuit takes only the power it needs.

Make sure you use the correct power plug for the jack you buy.

larryd:
The circuit takes only the power it needs.

Make sure you use the correct power plug for the jack you buy.

The data sheet on the LED strip says 0.3 watts per LED. I'm using a strip of 150, so that's a max of 45 watts... plus the Arduino with a small 4x20 character LCD display, both of which are negligible.

Should be safe, am I right?

erc207:
The data sheet on the LED strip says 0.3 watts per LED.

Better to work with current, because most power supplies have a voltage and (max) current rating.
An addressable LED can draw up to 60mA when all three colours are on.
That's 1500.06 = 9Amp for 150 LEDs. 9Amp5volt is indeed 45watt.
9Amp is too much for the internal wiring of a strip.
You must therefore power (5volt and ground) the strip on both ends.
Leo..

erc207:
This one looks promising. The product description says the rated load is 5A DC30V

I'm new at this, but that's 150 watts, correct? And my power supply is 10A 5V, so 50 watts, yes? 1/3 what the connector is rated for.

No that's not how connector ratings work. You have to stay within both the voltage and current ratings. So that connector is rated for up to 30V, no more, and up to 5A, no more. The power in watts has nothing to do with it.

Steve

Wawa:
Better to work with current, because most power supplies have a voltage and (max) current rating.
An addressable LED can draw up to 60mA when all three colours are on.
That's 1500.06 = 9Amp for 150 LEDs. 9Amp5volt is indeed 45watt.
9Amp is too much for the internal wiring of a strip.
You must therefore power (5volt and ground) the strip on both ends.
Leo..

That's exactly what I'm doing. When the strip was set to all white, they gradually went orange-red toward the end so I ran wires to provide power to both ends of the strip which eliminated the problem. Thankfully I didn't have to run more wire to the middle of the strip, I suck at soldering those pads.