Powering arduino with 12dc from pinball

Hello, I want to power an arduino whom controls a small led strip (10 leds) using the general illumination board form a pinball machine.

What the arduino needs to do is blink the leds at a certain moment. That i can handle, but how do i get enough power to the arduino? The general illumination on a pinball is 12V DC.

I do not want to use a battery. I want the arduino to power up when the pinball powers up.

I'm pretty new to all of this so I lack the technical knowledge to read difficult schemes.

Any help, in any form (pics, video, ....)would be appreciated

Thx
Peter

What Arduino board are you using ?

If the board has a barrel jack you could feed the 12V into that or into the Vin and GND connections on the board, but make very sure that the 12 supply is DC and not AC

If the board has a barrel jack you could feed the 12V into that or into the Vin and GND connections on the board

If you choose this method, keep in mind that the onboard 5V regulator will have to dissipate 5V (12-(5V+2
v headroom of regulator). The regulator may run slightly hot. It would automatically shutdown or reset it it
got too hot so if it doesn't do that they you're fine.

I would prefer a separate power adapter (a USB adapter, or old phone charger) for the Arduino. Even if that's a 12V DC it's bound to be VERY dirty, with all those solenoids in a typical pinball machine.

Otherwise, look for a USB charger designed for use in cars. Those are designed to handle a dirty 12V DC input, and will have no problem delivering enough current for an Arduino and 10 LEDs.

raschemmel:
If you choose this method, keep in mind that the onboard 5V regulator will have to dissipate 5V (12-(5V+2
v headroom of regulator). The regulator may run slightly hot.

You're apparently assuming the 10 LEDs will not run off that same 5V regulator... I assume they do. That regulator will in that case be way more than "slightly hot".

How hot is hot ?

see Reply#3 of this thread:
Arduio UNO running at 95 deg C with 12V input

According to this, that's 10 deg over safe operating temperature.

Look at this power supply: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00J3MHRNO/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

5vpsu.jpg

5vpsu.jpg

Thank you for all the advice. The power supply from Steve seems a pretty simple solution. Might go for that one.