Powering down nRF24L01+

I'm using the RF24Network library with a nRE24L01+ with some wireless temperature sensors. I have the power of the radio connected to a digital pin on the board so I can completely switch them off to save power.

I've been having problems with waking them up recently. Not sure if it's the new RF24/RF24Network libs or something else. I've got a test sketch running now which sends a signal to my Pi in the setup method then switches off the radio, but when I try to wake it up in the loop it won't send. Any ideas how I can fix it and make it send?

ChrisHigs:
I have the power of the radio connected to a digital pin on the board so I can completely switch them off to save power.

Very bad idea.

This will not work and could damage the Arduino.

If the Arduino is a 5V variant, it could damage the NRF too.

Hmm, ok, maybe I will have to rethink my plans then. Not 5V though, running on some AAs.

I've had a module running for just over a year and it's been running perfectly, switching the radio on and off. Until I decided to update the RF24 libraries and suddenly it won't connect to the new version on the Pi.

Oh, and one of the reasons I use switch off the radio is because on one of my sensors I use a LiIon battery and the voltage is a little too high for the radio. I have a zener diode attached to the output pin of the Atmega and connected to the power on the radio to drop the voltage to the right level. I don't want that powered all the time.

Probably not the best way to do it I know but it was working until I started playing around with the code and updating things recently.

So any way to either get the radio switching properly or a better way to regulate the power for the radio and not consume power? If I can I want to use a 40mAh Lir2032 battery to make it as small as I can so could do with saving power.

Got it working again anyway. Had to setup the radio again. I was already running radio.begin() but had to the the channel and data speed.

If you put the radio to [u]sleep[/u], it consumes negligible power (less than 1 microamp), and you won't damage the radio by applying voltages to dead inputs.

A low dropout (200 mV) linear voltage regulator is a much better way of powering the radio via a LiPo battery.