Programming Arduino in other languages, could it be done?

Somewhat off topic and rhetorical question so I am posting here instead of any of main Arduino topics.

Arduino IDE is based on C language and would be easy for people who had classes or training in some variants of C. But some of us older people grew up on different computer languages. Hypothetically would it be possible to have Arduino that can work on FORTRAN, COBOL, BASIC, PILOT, LOGO, Pascal, and many other older languages that are rarely used or taught today?

It seems somewhat possible to me. It'd need a translator that understands the syntax of other language and convert to C or AVR binary for compiling. Languages like PILOT and LOGO might do great with LCD or large LED matrix for displaying graphic for example, and BASIC is still pretty easy to learn.

"Arduino IDE is based on C language"
No, it is C++.

I did a google search "fortran to C++ conversion" and found this

so it certainly seems possible to get most of the way there, with some post conversion cleanup needed.
Try a search on the others as well.

In the end I suspect it may be simpler to learn C++ (which seemed like fancy BASIC to me when I started summer 2010) vs having to deal with conversion oddities.

Hi.

Personally, i don't see the point in doing so, but it's supposed to be possible to use Basic to program your Arduino.
You'd use BASCOM for that, and every now and then that is mentioned over here at the forum.
If you Google for bascom and Arduino, you'll find some results.

For me, Basic was 30 years ago, playing with my Commodore 64.
I'm happy with Arduino as it is today (still lots to learn).

The folks at Elektor Magazine program with BASCOM.

wilykat:
Hypothetically would it be possible to have Arduino that can work on FORTRAN, COBOL, BASIC, PILOT, LOGO, Pascal, and many other older languages that are rarely used or taught today?

No problem. Just write the appropriate cross-compiler :slight_smile:

...R

Gcc theoreticallly supports fortran, pascal, and ada, but those languages also require a much larger "runtime environment" than C/C++, which I don't think has been written for avr.
Forth will run on avrs. There are several commercial basic and at least one pascal...
A lot of languages really want to have much more Ram than is present on an avr.

COBOL is absolutely and definitely not usable. In 1981 I was tasked with making a way for Interactive COBOL programs on a Data General mini to communicate with the outside world of ATMs, teller terminals and ATM networks. The COBOL had no timing facility and no way to handle EBCDIC characters as it was strictly ASCII 7 bit characters.

I designed and programed a communications front-end processor using an Apple II+ and IIE because the IBM PC was not available.

Burroughs corporation advertised they could use COBOL to program for any device. When you looked at the COBOL code they had instructions to “enter symbolic” and “enter COBOL”.

Paul