Prototyping shield

I've got myself an arduino, and I'm loving it so far.

The only problem is, stretching stuff all over the board isn't working great. So I bought a prototyping shield.

It looks exactly like this one: http://www.ladyada.net/make/pshield/

And it came with the mini breadboard in the picture 3rd from the top.

The only problem is, I can't mount the breadboard. I'd like to have it on there permanently, but soldering isn't working at all, and I'd rather not tape it on.

The breadboard's a pretty standard one, flat bottom with two rows of connectors. It fits perfectly on the shield.

Anyone have tips?

Thanks, Kale

Normally, you use double-sided foam tape. You could try JBWeld or some other 2-part epoxy (realize that this -will- make it permanent)...

double sided foam tape doesn't allow connections. the bottom of the breadboard needs to contact the ground/5V connectors on the shield.

the bottom of the breadboard needs to contact the ground/5V connectors on the shield.

No, it doesn't. That's what jumpers are for.

Well then. I'm going to need a hell of a lot of jumpers then.

this one? Not sure what you mean by

the bottom of the breadboard needs to contact the ground/5V connectors on the shield.

You are expecting the +5/Gnd do show up in some particular rows on the breadboard from undereath? I don't think they are intended to work like that. You could always hot glue it on, that will stick well but not be as permanent as epoxy.

I find the little ones never provide nearly enough unique connection points. I personally have a duemilanove screwed to a clipboard with 3 830 contact breadboards doubletaped as well, gives me room for severeal 7 segment displays, some driver chips, current limit resistors, etc. with a little finger room to place & move wires as needed.

yeah, that one.

I was kinda confused, but I've got it working now.

It would be nice if things were already connected though.

Connected to what? There is no way to know your intended use :-) Say you were driving a bunch of LEDs and wanted a 12V source, then you would bring in external 12v, wire up your LEDs and current limit resistors, add in a mosfet transistor and go to an arduino pin. The only thing connected would be ground in that case. That's the beauty of protoboards, the flexibility they provide.

I see.

What kind of things are you working on? I was playing with an RF receiver today, the RF part is 17 holes long. Has 4 pins, 9 pins worth of no pins, then 4 more pins, see below. I needed an 74ls04 inverter for the serial device that my duemilanove was sendig the received data to. I would have had to mount the 74ls04 so that 7 of its pins went into the 9 non-pins. That would have left 8 1/2 half rows for other unique connections, like a coupled of status LEDs and resisters. I am guessing you will outgrow that little breadboard before you get too far...

What you said:

What kind of things are you working on? I was playing with an RF receiver today, the RF part is 17 holes long. Has 4 pins, 9 pins worth of no pins, then 4 more pins, see below. I needed an 74ls04 inverter for the serial device that my duemilanove was sendig the received data to. I would have had to mount the 74ls04 so that 7 of its pins went into the 9 non-pins. That would have left 8 1/2 half rows for other unique connections, like a coupled of status LEDs and resisters. I am guessing you will outgrow that little breadboard before you get too far...

What I read:

I was playing with a Radio Frequency receiver today, the RF part is 17 holes long. Has 4 pins, 9 pins worth of no pins, then 4 more pins, see below. I needed a garble garble garble garble garble garble garble garble garble garble garble garble garble garble garble garble garble garble garble garble garble garble garble I am guessing you will outgrow that little breadboard before you get too far...

I'm pretty new with this stuff. lol. So far, I've got a blinking light, that changes blinking speed when you press a button.

Made me LOL, thanks! Gotta start somewhere, wind up with something bigger eventually.

Post often, let us know how you're making out :-)

Robert