Public IP address "website"

Hello, I was wondering what you did to make your IP address a public website page for all to access? I'm trying to do that same thing but I can only access my IP "website" when I'm on my home router. Thanks in advance!

You need to assign the ethernet shield a public ip, or port forward a port from your router to the ethernet shield's private ip.

But even this may not work if you do not have a commercial account with a static ip. Many ISPs block port 80 requests from the internet to public ips that are not a commercial account. They normally want more money for this type account.

SurferTim:
Many ISPs block port 80 requests from the internet to public ips that are not a commercial account. They normally want more money for this type account.

I haven’t encountered that, and I’m not aware of any of the UK providers doing it. Some of them provide a firewall, but that’s a completely different issue and you should have the means to configure the firewall policy to allow access to your server if you want. Usually it’s enough to set up port forwarding within the home network and register the address with a dynamic DNS service.

@PeterH: They do it here in the U.S., and it is very common now. My ISP (Cox Communications) blocks port 80 requests to non-commercial ip addresses. I'll bet in the U.K. there are ISPs that do the same. I've dealt with several users from different countries that have port 80 requests from the internet blocked. They had to resort to port 8080 or the like.

Those dynamic DNS services are the reason the blocks are being implemented. It normally requires a commercial account to host a website, and the ISPs want their money for doing that. Besides, even if your ISP does not block port 80, I'll almost bet it is in violation of your contract with your ISP to host a public website with a residential account. It is here.

Blocking based purely on port numbers is so ridiculously easy to circumvent that it seems pointless. Are you sure you aren't just falling foul of a default firewall? Residential accounts here in the UK aren't well suited for commercial use because they're asymmetric and provide very low upstream bandwidth, and because they do not have availability guarantees. I'm struggling to imagine how they could have worded a condition to prevent hosting a public-facing web server without also ruling out internet cameras, skype, peer-to-peer file sharing and online games and so on. None of the ISPs I've used here in the UK have imposed restrictions on what services can be used, except that they're not allowed to be used for anything that damages the service. I forget the exact wording but I seem to remember reading some terms that ruled out using the service for illegal activity, but of course the fact that it's illegal trumps anything the Ts&Cs might say. The closest any of them have come to actually blocking services that I can think of has been throttling peer-to-peer file sharing traffic, and throttling people who have exceeded their data quota. I fully accept that it's different there, but don't assume that ISPs everywhere are like yours.

Blocking based purely on port numbers is so ridiculously easy to circumvent that it seems pointless. Are you sure you aren't just falling foul of a default firewall?

Nope. I am a network routing specialist. It is not a firewall problem. It is an intentional block implemented by my ISP. I deal with the same problems with users on this forum also when they try to access the webfig page on their routers: http://forum.mikrotik.com/index.php I am SurferTim on that forum also.

It is easy to circumvent for those who are "in the know", but not for a novice. I use ports 8080 to 8088 to avoid the block for others, but I don't need it. I have several static ips on a commercial account.

SurferTim: It is not a firewall problem.

In case it wasn't clear, I was referring to a user-controlled firewall at the ISP - not just at the router or client PC. I've seen two UK ISPs provide these as protection against inbound attacks, and they needed to be configured (via the ISP's portal) to allow inbound traffic on specific ports.

http://www.mediasmartserver.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=8496

Need I go on?

SurferTim: Need I go on?

No. I believe you when you say it happens, and I suppose this would be backed up by corresponding restrictions in the ToS, but I'm sorry for you having to put up with such restrictive access. Please don't assume that this is a universal problem - it isn't. If your ISP is daft enough to block specific port numbers then the workaround of using different port numbers is so trivial that it hardly needs mentioning. If they prohibit using their services to host publicly accessible servers (however that restriction might be worded) then IMO you need a new ISP; there are all sorts of commonly used services that would fall foul of that and I can't imagine how somebody prohibiting servers in general would stay in business.

You live in the UK which is lucky. We have 4 ISPs here in Australia and every single one of them blocks port 80.

Very similar thing in the US - most ISPs in the US block port 80.

I imagine the majority of ISPs block port 80, but of course there are exceptions like few UK ISPs doing so.

It may not be a 'universal problem', but it is definitely a problem that affects a very significant amount of users.

If they prohibit using their services to host publicly accessible servers (however that restriction might be worded) then IMO you need a new ISP; there are all sorts of commonly used services that would fall foul of that and I can't imagine how somebody prohibiting servers in general would stay in business.

They stay in business by offering a reduced rate ($29-$49 per month) to residential customers who do not wish to host a website, but give up the use of port 80/443 for that purpose. If you want to host a website and open port 80/443 to your ip, then you pay the standard rate ($99+ per month).

edit: And some offer the commercial customers more bandwidth during busy hours. They bandwidth throttle residential customers first.

, I'll almost bet it is in violation of your contract with your ISP to host a public website with a residential account.

The wording may need to be refined. The TOS more likely uses terms like "commercial website" or for "commercial purposes", Many residential accounts may run web cams, PCAnywhere, home automation servers and such, which probably are not restricted in the TOS. I know that the company I work for blocs access to servers running on ports other than the typical 80, 443, etc. I think it is due to the fact that many Trojan applications connect to servers operating on non standard ports.

zoomkat:

, I'll almost bet it is in violation of your contract with your ISP to host a public website with a residential account.

The wording may need to be refined. The TOS more likely uses terms like "commercial website" or for "commercial purposes", Many residential accounts may run web cams, PCAnywhere, home automation servers and such, which probably are not restricted in the TOS. I know that the company I work for blocs access to servers running on ports other than the typical 80, 443, etc. I think it is due to the fact that many Trojan applications connect to servers operating on non standard ports.

This has been my experience as well. With all the self-hosted "cloud" services that have come out, most ISPs don't mind if you run your own web server for small things. They will nail you if you try to host a commercial website though.

Blocking ports doesn't really have much to do with money, ISPs make all their money from the users that pay for the lower tiers. This is to combat malicious internet use. It was common in the late 90's and early 2000's for home users to get their PCs infected with spam sending trojans or viruses. Having a few hundred users on your network max out their internet connection by sending out spam can bring a network to its knees. Blocking ports made this type of attack less profitable, and it eventually fell out of common practice.

The below site can be used to see if your ISP is blocking port 80. I set my arduino server to use port 80 and set my router to port forward to arduino lan ip address and the below returned a positive test. Also checked my arduino server using my no-ip address and it also worked using port 80.

http://canyouseeme.org/