Question about DIL socket

So I've made a "stand alone" on a breadboard using an ATmega328 and I'm ready to solder one up.

Just wondering, does this http://www.altronics.com.au/index.asp?area=item&id=P0571 allow an Atmega328 (or others) to be "plugged" into it?

And if so, is the purpose of it to A) Be able to use an Atmega328 in a soldered circuit without directly soldering the Atmega itself and cause potential damage, and B) once the socket is soldered in, you can swap different Atmegas in and out at will?

Thanks :)

Yep that's just your basic IC (integrated circuit) socket. Same as on an Uno. Good idea if the chip might ever need to be taken out. On the other hand, there is no reason to fear damaging a chip by soldering it in, if it's done reasonably well. I use sockets a lot but I've also soldered a few in. Some care is needed putting the chip into the socket as well as removing it, a fair amount of force is needed to extract the chip especially from a new socket. These work well for me.

PS: If you haven't already noticed, the pins on most DIL ICs are not parallel as they come from the factory. They need to be bent slightly until they are parallel before inserting into a socket. The old trick of pressing each side of the chip against a tabletop can work, but I find this tool to be a lot better, especially with the larger chips.

[quote author=Jack Christensen link=topic=184348.msg1365322#msg1365322 date=1377390515] Yep that's just your basic IC (integrated circuit) socket. Same as on an Uno. Good idea if the chip might ever need to be taken out. On the other hand, there is no reason to fear damaging a chip by soldering it in, if it's done reasonably well. I use sockets a lot but I've also soldered a few in. Some care is needed putting the chip into the socket as well as removing it, a fair amount of force is needed to extract the chip especially from a new socket. These work well for me. [/quote]

Ok, thanks for your help! I already have a few tools I can use for removing the chip from the socket in a kit I got a while back. My soldering skills are somewhat still sub-par so a little more practice is needed, so personally for me the socket is fantastic. Thanks again for your help!

Soldering in sockets is good practice, and there's no worry about overheating a chip or whatever :)

If you are thinking of removing and replacing the chip very much you might consider a Zero Insertion Force socket. They cost way more (around $10.00 each) than a regular socket but may be worth it as the chance of bending pins is , well, zero.

groundfungus: If you are thinking of removing and replacing the chip very much you might consider a Zero Insertion Force socket. They cost way more (around $10.00 each) than a regular socket but may be worth it as the chance of bending pins is , well, zero.

http://www.dipmicro.com/store/index.php?act=viewProd&productCode=ZIF28 ($2.65 AUD)

Worth every penny if you're planning on a lot of swapping in/out.