question for visuino programming

how does visuino output programs by just inputs and outputs graphicaly . what i mean for example how

does it understand that for say input pin no.X the output of pin Y should change and not pin Z , as we are

not giving any conditions in our drawings i.e for a particular input pin X particular pin Y should be affected

The reason for asking is that a programmer has multiple inputs and outputs when writing a big program .

but in this the code is generated on drawings ,so how will the compiler know what’s the programmer

requires finally

That sounds like a question that would be answered in the documentation for Visuino, or at the Visuino forum.

Graphical programming tools are always very limiting, as the graphical interface does not provide the flexibility and detail of real programming. Graphical programming is IMO not even suited to teaching kids to code; it is so constrained you'll never keep them interested, because you can't really do anything cool with it...

spiba:
but in this the code is generated on drawings ,so how will the compiler know what’s the programmer
requires finally

Yes, Visuino looks at the design and figures out exactly what you want. Visuino is Object Oriented Programming of the highest level, and even optimizes the code based on the features you use and the features you don’t.

It is the same way as comparing C++ to Assembly code, and asking how the compiler knows what the developer wants to do with the registers. The developer does not want to do something with registers, he/she wants to control actuators, do serial communication, read sensors etc. :wink:

Cheers,
Boian

but say if for a low at pin 2 making it input , the developer wants to pin 10 ( output )to be set by the programme. By just putting a switch at input and by connecting something say a relay at pin 10 , while diferrent inputs and outputs are used for various other functions , will visuino generate the correct code for all multifunctions ?

The "Arduino UNO" block has 13 digital pins and 6 analog input pins. You connect you logic to the pin of your choice. Each input comes from the pin YOU choose. Each outputs goes to the pin YOU choose.

spiba: will visuino generate the correct code for all multifunctions ?

Yes, it generates the correct code for each pin :-) Some will be made inputs automatically, some outputs, and some will even switch if needed (When you connect Ultrasonic Ranger with single pin, or DHT11 etc.). Visuino looks at the diagram, and based on what you have connected understands how each pin needs to be configured. You even have options to specify if the pin needs to use the PullUp/PullDown resistor, or if needs to be OpenDrain (for boards that have PullDown or OpenDrain), and you can even control the On/Off for those functions with logic blocks.

Cheers, Boian

spiba: but say if for a low at pin 2 making it input ,

You know, instead of us SPAMing this Arduino forum, you probably should join and ask in the Visuino G+ community ;-) . https://plus.google.com/communities/116125623808250792822 And you can just try Visuino and test for yourself to see how it works ;-) .

DrAzzy. Where do you get the idea of "Graphical programming tools are always very limiting"? If we talk arduino it might be right. But that is also one point why the industry barely use arduino as automation programming or for data collecting and massurement. Of course I would like more features in Visuino and Mitov is doing a great work getting there. If we talking programming computers I would say in LabView you get both low and hi level programming environment. What could be better? CERN is programmed in LabView... What is "real programming"? IMO it is the end result that is important not how you got there. Have you asked the author of your favorite book what typewriter he use?

Where do you get the idea of "Graphical programming tools are always very limiting"?

Because ANY language offers hundreds (or more) keywords and statements. Any graphical programming tool can only support a limited set of those keywords and statements without cluttering the screen with hundreds of incomprehensible icons and menus. It is always a compromise in deciding which keywords and statements to offer in a drag-and-drop methodology, between completeness and comprehensibility.

PaulS: Any graphical programming tool can only support a limited set of those keywords and statements without cluttering the screen with hundreds of incomprehensible icons and menus.

Only if the tool is badly written ;-) .

mitov: Only if the tool is badly written ;-) .

Show me an example of a tool that supports ALL the features of C++ that does not have a bazillion icons. Show me what an icon for an anonymous lambda expression would look like that would CLEARLY distinguish it from an icon for a named lambda expression.

Then, you can make that ridiculous claim.

What graphical programming tool is not limiting and is well written?

PaulS: Show me an example of a tool that supports ALL the features of C++ that does not have a bazillion icons. Show me what an icon for an anonymous lambda expression would look like that would CLEARLY distinguish it from an icon for a named lambda expression.

Then, you can make that ridiculous claim.

Anonymous lambda - 8) λ Named lambda - George λ

PaulS: Then, you can make that ridiculous claim.

I think the adoption of Visuino as example speaks for itself ;-) The components/icons are equivalent to libraries and as such are no more difficult to use/find and then finding/using the one of the gazilions C++ libraries :-) Since the Visuino uses dataflow (Parallel execution), it uses completely different concept than sequential programming, and has no need of Lambda expression. It simply is a different language that achieves the same results, just much easier to use, and nowadays producing on average better and smaller code :-) It is yet to demonstrate any limitations compare to manual C++ coding, and it is still in its infancy. Just wait for another 2-3 months... ;-)

and it is still in its infancy. Just wait for another 2-3 months... ;-)

Why should we? The - I'll use the term people - that "need" such a tool have been around from a very long time. The Arduino, and C++, have been around for a long time. Why is such a "necessary" tool still in it's infancy?

AWOL:
Anonymous lambda - 8) λ
Named lambda - George λ

Anonymous lambda -
Named lambda -

hl2_03__r106048631.png

gman.gif

PaulS: Why should we? The - I'll use the term people - that "need" such a tool have been around from a very long time. The Arduino, and C++, have been around for a long time. Why is such a "necessary" tool still in it's infancy?

Airplanes were also in need but at some point were in infancy. I remember when C++ was in need around 1989 and it was in infancy... That's how new technologies work... ;-) .

darrob: Anonymous lambda - Named lambda -

In that tiny pic, the G-man looks a bit like Sheldon Cooper! (I love Half Life)

mitov: Airplanes were also in need but at some point were in infancy. I remember when C++ was in need around 1998 and it was in infancy... That's how new technologies work... ;-) .

In 1998, C++ was a teenager . . .

AWOL: In 1998, C++ was a teenager . . .

We all were at some point... ;-)