Question on Arduino Specifications

Hey there!

I’m considering using the Arduino for a couple demonstration projects, and I’d like to know if there is any information on the board’s operating temperatures and vibration resistance. It is possible that the board will be required to function in temperatures ranging from -10C to 50C, so I’d like to know the baseline capabilities if possible.

Thank you very much!

I'm not sure about the board overall, but the [u]ATmega Datasheet[/u] specifies the Atmel chip is rated from -40 to 105 degrees C.

You also need to consider condensation and potential damage from frozen condensation. At higher temperatures, the current capability of the voltage regulator will be reduced. The voltage regulator is probably OK at higher temperatures if it's just powering the Arduino, but it can be stressed of you are powering other things from it. The voltage regulator also gets hotter with higher applied voltage (more voltage dropped across the regulator).

What is your application?
Which Arduino are you interested in?
The UNO has its controller in a socket, this may be a problem if you have lots of vibration.
Also the headers of an Arduino may become an intermittent problem source in some applications.

Maybe develope your product on an Arduino and move it to a standalone board.

LarryD:
What is your application?
Which Arduino are you interested in?
The UNO has its controller in a socket, this may be a problem if you have lots of vibration.
Also the headers of an Arduino may become an intermittent problem source in some applications.

Maybe develop your product on an Arduino and move it to a standalone board.

I’m not sure what Arduino I’m interested in just yet. I’m looking to get one or two to experiment with programming and bread-boarding, with the goal of eventually scaling up to a basic prototype. If another setup is required for the actual product, then using it for demonstration purposes is fine.

The goal is to examine cost and simplicity of a maintenance evaluation system, as well as using as many off-the-shelf components as possible. Inputs would be storing data such as the heat of critical components, counting the actuation cycles of mechanical components, and then alerting the user when certain components are nearing their lifespan to perform work on the system. Ideally, it would be nice to be able to receive a response curve such as a dampening cycle. If the curve starts performing outside of specifications, the part can be tagged for replacement.

If that is successful, the next step would be to see if it also can drive a small DC motor and several levers, becoming the brain of the system as well.

DVDdoug:
I’m not sure about the board overall, but the [u]ATmega Datasheet[/u] specifies the Atmel chip is rated from -40 to 105 degrees C.

You also need to consider condensation and potential damage from frozen condensation. At higher temperatures, the current capability of the voltage regulator will be reduced. The voltage regulator is probably OK at higher temperatures if it’s just powering the Arduino, but it can be stressed of you are powering other things from it. The voltage regulator also gets hotter with higher applied voltage (more voltage dropped across the regulator).

Good to know. Ideally, the Arduino would be operating in a completely sealed environment (such as the grip of a hand tool) to keep out contaminants. For driving other components, it would be possible to have separate voltage regulators or capacitors that would just be triggered on or off by the Arduino, correct? Its been ages since I’ve done a basic electronics project.