Question regarding permanent project

I hope this is the right place to post, I'm just getting into micro controllers and code my question is I don't seem to see any permanant sensors on the market for instance the temp and humidity sensor DHT22 it doesn't seem to be weatherproof many other sensors seem to be only for proof of concept am I missing something here.

Say I made a project on a breadboard and want to finalize it do the sensors that come with kits actually get used or is there another source for these. I have purchased a few controllers and shields such as a screw shield for a more permanent solution but I think I must be missing something no?

Depends on what your ultimate goal is. YOU are building the project, so there will always be different items to address. Otherwise, you are just buying a turn key product, right?

Those modules are good for proof of concept and learning, and in most instances can be used for the end product if space allows. Pins can be removed and wires soldered in. Enclosures need to be made. You can also purchase the components and design your own circuit board and have it made for a small fee. You can also buy breakout boards and screw them to a backboard and connect them as you wish.

Try looking at Adafruit.com and Sparkfun. They carry a whole line of shields, hats, modules, breakouts, kitchen sinks etc. They also provide tutorials on how to use and code for their products, along with tech specs (important), unlike much of the stuff on ebay. There, you're on your own.

Hi,
If you are looking at production or using the sensors in the environment and want them to survive their surroundings for long lengths of time, then you will need to go to industrial grade sensors.
This is where the cost escalates and some need maintenance and regular expensive calibration.

You can provide protection for the smaller cheaper devices, a lot of them were developed during the rise of xbox, wii and PS boxes and hence their low cost,.

Regular replacement cost may have to be weighed against cost of more "professional" "indiustrial" sensors.

Tom..... :slight_smile:

I see I have looked on those sites and they do offer allot I know I'll be making enclosures and the like but for instance the moisture sensor does what it says but doesn't seem to be designed outside of the test phase so I guess getting creative to make these sensors work in the extreme environment is up to me I'll keep looking I'm sure there are variants suited for what I would like to do TY for the input!

When you want to get into a more demanding component, you can always go to DigiKey and look at individual components and the like. It all depends on what you expect. Yes, Adafruit and Sparkfun are more aimed at hobby use and learning, which demands that the modules be inexpensive. A quick look at digikey shows a humidity sensor from $700 and down to $2.04.

It all depends on what you want to do. Of course you will have to design pcb's, and get comfortable with working with tiny smd components for many sensors.

tinman13kup:
When you want to get into a more demanding component, you can always go to DigiKey and look at individual components and the like. It all depends on what you expect. Yes, Adafruit and Sparkfun are more aimed at hobby use and learning, which demands that the modules be inexpensive. A quick look at digikey shows a humidity sensor from $700 and down to $2.04.

It all depends on what you want to do. Of course you will have to design pcb's, and get comfortable with working with tiny smd components for many sensors.

TY didn't know about that site will give it a look, I'm not really trying to reinvent the wheel or anything I just thought I was missing something about making a permanent design I ordered a few boards and some components will see where that leads thanks again for the info!

Some sensors are weatherproof by nature, others (like the DHT22 and most other humidity sensors) not so much. The problem is that of course to sense humidity you have to let air in, but you should not get any water in.

The DHT22 is used by many people in (semi)permanent installations including outdoors, but it's mounted in a sheltered position. I'm about to deploy one that's screwed on the bottom of an otherwise waterproof enclosure, so the enclosure is the shelter, and then placed on the balcony where it's not exposed to too much rain. That should keep it from getting wet and breaking down.

wvmarle:
Some sensors are weatherproof by nature, others (like the DHT22 and most other humidity sensors) not so much. The problem is that of course to sense humidity you have to let air in, but you should not get any water in.

The DHT22 is used by many people in (semi)permanent installations including outdoors, but it's mounted in a sheltered position. I'm about to deploy one that's screwed on the bottom of an otherwise waterproof enclosure, so the enclosure is the shelter, and then placed on the balcony where it's not exposed to too much rain. That should keep it from getting wet and breaking down.

Great that was my idea as well to put it in an enclosure facing downward and some of the water sensors in a sealed enclosure with the sensor portion protruding from said case, thanks for the input!