Quick question regarding potmeter

Hello guys! Im new here, and to Arduino in general.
I have a quick question ; Does any of you see a reason if https://www.elfadistrelec.no/no/rotasjonspotensiometer-kohm-kabelkobling-contelec-ml/p/16434826?q=potmeter&filter_Toleranse=%26plusmn%3B2+%&page=6&origPos=722&origPageSize=50&simi=97.87 would work as intended on an Arduino Uno?
I mean, its 5kOhm - but as it is very expensive I would like a second opinion!

Regards,
Espen

Generally speaking, yes, you can use it with Arduino.
If it works the way you need in your specific application is a different question. What do you want to do with it, exactly?

GalFisk:
Generally speaking, yes, you can use it with Arduino.
If it works the way you need in your specific application is a different question. What do you want to do with it, exactly?

Thanks for the answer!

I am going to use it as a way to measure a rotating pipe's orientation. I'll mount some sort of rubber wheel to it, and read the voltage which then will be converted to degrees!
Need to use a potmeter which has several turns in order to reduce the size of the mounted wheel (As the circumference of the pipe can be rather large).

Ok, some things to bear in mind:

  1. The precision of the measurement will depend on the precision of your mechanical linkage
  2. The tolerance of the potentiometer is 2%. If you make a perfect mecanical linkage, and rotate the pipe 360° for 6 entire rotations of the potentiometer, you will have a tolerance of up to +/- 3.6°. A rubber wheel will introduce additional tolerance, because the rubber will be squashed and therefore the practical wheel diameter will be a little uncertain. If you use a smaller number of potentiometer rotations to represent 360°, your tolerance will also be worse.
    A rotary encoder could be both better and cheaper, depending on how the pipe will actually rotate. The first advantage to an encoder is that it can rotate indefinitely in either direction. The second is that it gives out pulses which can simply be counted, which gets rid of any analog imprecision. A mouse wheel is a cheap rotary encoder, though I don't know about the precision or how to make one speak with Arduino.
    A disadvantage is that you can only know the current position by starting at 0° or a known angle, counting every pulse in either direction and calculating the current position. If you were to lose pulses (or gain spurious ones), you must start over.
    Another alternative could be to print a sticker with machine-readable degree markings and put it on the pipe itself. It could possibly be read by a simple horizontal barcode scanner, at least when the pipe is moving slowly. An advantage is no additional mechanical devices. I'm not sure how easy it is to make such a sticker precise.
    A hybrid between this and the rotary encoded would be to print a sticker with alternating black and white lines every degree (or whatever resolution you desire), and using photo detectors to count how many black and white areas pass by in either direction.
    I think there exist complete solutions for the optical solutions, but I haven't tested or even looked for any.

GalFisk:
Ok, some things to bear in mind:

  1. The precision of the measurement will depend on the precision of your mechanical linkage
  2. The tolerance of the potentiometer is 2%. If you make a perfect mecanical linkage, and rotate the pipe 360° for 6 entire rotations of the potentiometer, you will have a tolerance of up to +/- 3.6°. A rubber wheel will introduce additional tolerance, because the rubber will be squashed and therefore the practical wheel diameter will be a little uncertain. If you use a smaller number of potentiometer rotations to represent 360°, your tolerance will also be worse.
    A rotary encoder could be both better and cheaper, depending on how the pipe will actually rotate. The first advantage to an encoder is that it can rotate indefinitely in either direction. The second is that it gives out pulses which can simply be counted, which gets rid of any analog imprecision. A mouse wheel is a cheap rotary encoder, though I don't know about the precision or how to make one speak with Arduino.
    A disadvantage is that you can only know the current position by starting at 0° or a known angle, counting every pulse in either direction and calculating the current position. If you were to lose pulses (or gain spurious ones), you must start over.
    Another alternative could be to print a sticker with machine-readable degree markings and put it on the pipe itself. It could possibly be read by a simple horizontal barcode scanner, at least when the pipe is moving slowly. An advantage is no additional mechanical devices. I'm not sure how easy it is to make such a sticker precise.
    A hybrid between this and the rotary encoded would be to print a sticker with alternating black and white lines every degree (or whatever resolution you desire), and using photo detectors to count how many black and white areas pass by in either direction.
    I think there exist complete solutions for the optical solutions, but I haven't tested or even looked for any.

Thank you for a thorough answer! Will give the encoders a look!