RC/AI car model

So, I've got my arduino uno controller and went through the first chapter of Jeremy Blum's book.
After that I was planning to make a basic moving platform and that's where I hit the wall - every single guide I find has schematics and stuff, but none of them lists the parts you need - I literally have no idea how am I supposed to transfer motion from motor to wheels, what parts do I need and what's their names. Anyone here knows a good source of information of that kind? Wheels, gearboxes, junctions between them - that's not kind of stuff you can make by yourself, so atleast I need to know how to call all that stuff.

google arduino car kits

Those are pretty expensive and limiting. I need to know about motion transferring and what parts are used for it.

not that expensive if you search "arduino car motor" and "arduino H-bridge module" on ebay or aliexpress. They got all difficult mechanical stuff - motor + gear + wheel mounted on a single unit. One H-bridge module can be used to power and control speed to two motors, or if you want 4wd it can control two motor pairs.

If you truly have no idea then selecting your own parts and bolting them together will turn out to be very expensive. Just buy a ready-to-drive chassis kit. Pololu make some good ones. Once you get it, you will understand more about it and you will know what questions to ask to build your next one.

blimpyway:
not that expensive if you search "arduino car motor" and "arduino H-bridge module" on ebay or aliexpress. They got all difficult mechanical stuff - motor + gear + wheel mounted on a single unit. One H-bridge module can be used to power and control speed to two motors, or if you want 4wd it can control two motor pairs.

Well, I was quite surprised when I found out that wheels and stuff cost so much (especially the brand stuff for manufactured rc models).
Does it have to be an H bridge, or I can just get a driver with suitable voltage?

MorganS:
If you truly have no idea then selecting your own parts and bolting them together will turn out to be very expensive. Just buy a ready-to-drive chassis kit. Pololu make some good ones. Once you get it, you will understand more about it and you will know what questions to ask to build your next one.

Pololu is a great advice, since it has wheels and motors meant to used together. Though I can't understand what means 'single shaft, gearbox only' and 'dual-shaft gearbox and motor'. Also I don't see any kind of shafts to simply connect a pair of wheels.
I'm also wondering if it's a good idea to have a separate motor on each wheel. Like, there's no guarantee motors will work at the same rpm, right?

like, there's no guarantee motors will work at the same rpm, right?

They won't. You need an encoder and a speed controller for each motor.

H-bridge is necessary if you want the motor to be able to drive in reverse. For most robot type projects, that is necessary.

"Dual shaft" often indicates that you can put a wheel on both sides of the gearbox and it will drive both at identical speed. Note that this is not a good arrangement as it makes turning difficult, even if you have steerable front wheels. "Gearbox only" would indicate that you need to buy a compatible motor to drive the gearbox.

Yes, many robot designs use two motors, two driven wheels (or crawler tracks) and a castering non-driven wheel. Yes, making them drive perfectly straight is an issue - normally you use methods that don't rely on straight driving. "Follow the left wall" in a maze doesn't require the robot to drive straight, but it does require it to be steerable.

I really like the look of the Polou 3pi robot chassis. That will get you started, with lots of options to put on an Arduino, maybe an LCD screen or whatever.

Their Zumo chassis is also good. I believe it's designed for a specific "robot sumo" class but it can be used for anything you can imagine.

jremington:
They won't. You need an encoder and a speed controller for each motor.

How does it work then? I thought you just connect a motor to a PWM pin via motor driver. Guess with an encoder and speed controlling the program becomes much more complicated

MorganS:
H-bridge is necessary if you want the motor to be able to drive in reverse. For most robot type projects, that is necessary.

Don't motor drivers have built-in H-bridges?

MorganS:
"Gearbox only" would indicate that you need to buy a compatible motor to drive the gearbox

Apparently I have a completely wrong idea about what a gearbox is.
What does that mean anyway?

Well h-bridges are often called motor drivrs by some sellers. Arduino can keep a straight-ish line if the wheels have rotary encoders or by using compass or gyro modules like hmc5883 or mpu6050 which are quite cheap now