Reading arbitrary number of inputs on the same input pins

What would be the best way to read the input of an unknown number of hall sensors (somewhere from 5 to 60) on the smallest number of pins?

I am not very familiar with circuits but as I understand the analog input pins on the Arduino are able to read discrete input values. Would it be feasible to daisy chain the hall sensors together each with increasing resistors all into one input? There will not be more than one sensor activated at a time.

The board would also need to determine the total number of sensors attached, which I assume would be relatively easy, in the case of having them all on one pin it would read the step size from one hall sensor to the other and divide the total analog input range by it.

As unfamiliar as I am with circuits, I still don't think that I could have up to 60 increasing sized resistors in one daisy chain and have it work. What would be the best solution for this? Thank you.

nakiami:
What would be the best way to read the input of an unknown number of hall sensors (somewhere from 5 to 60) on the smallest number of pins?

Port expanders.
A 74HC4067 breakout board can turn one analogue pin into 16 analogue pins.
Four of those muxer boards, connected to four analogue pins, is 64 analogue inputs.

Are you sure you got analogue hall sensors.
Leo..

They aren't analogue sensors. I think this is what I am looking for though SparkFun 16 Output I/O Expander Breakout - SX1509 - BOB-13601 - SparkFun Electronics.

MCP23017 or PCF8575 port extenders, 16 digital inputs each. Each option offers up t0 128 digital inputs on a pair of pins (I2C). The SX1509 as you link to may also work, no experience with that one. Note that it appears to be a 3.3V part.
Parallel in serial out shift registers are another option.
Then to determine which of your inputs has a hall switch attached, and which one not. You can do that by connecting each input to a separate output through a 10k resistor. The hall switches normally have push/pull outputs, so if your input follows the output through the resistor, there's no hall switch attached. If your input remains high when you set your output low, or low when you set your output high, the hall switch is connected. Well, you can actually probably connect a number of inputs to a single output, each with a separate 10k resistor of course, that saves on extra output pins.