recemendation for prototyping parts

Hello, first arduino project for me. I plan on building a small DMX light board using the info on Arduino:playground/Learning/DMX The goal of the first project is 3 faders, 4 or 5 pots, and some buttons in a housing.

I have a strong back ground in electronics and computers so no worries on the design and programming part. What I am new at is building prototype boards. I was hoping to use a bread board but I fear that the pin out of the faders will not lend them selves to a breadboard lay out in the way I hope. So I may have to use round pots for proof of concept and then build the faders into an enclosure.

So far I have as my shopping list: seedmega dangershield breadboard screw terminal wings shield Arduino Nano USB pots (Digikey P3G7103-ND) (guessed based on similar specs to the fader) faders (Digikey PP1045SD-ND) some DMX / rs485 driver chips other little bits as needed

The mega and dangershield are for getting started with some smaller programs to get my feet wet. I also plan on using the mega for main prototyping work and then transferring to smaller boards for the finished project. Assming I stay withing the limits of the smaller boards. How much trouble should I expect transferring the program from the mega with rotary pots or the dangershiled to the usbnano with digikey faders and pots? Any recommendations for breadboard friendly faders and pots?

Thank you.

I'm trying to build something very similar. You should check out a rotary encoder. It might be a cheaper and more convenient way to control everything.

If you decide to stick with the faders, for experimentation purposes, I would get a small piece of thin hobby plywood, and mount the faders onto the plywood, then mount the plywood onto a temporary enclosure (even a cardboard box would do). Solder the fader's pins to a length of ribbon cable or other wire to bring the pins out to connect the breadboard and then the Arduino.

BTW - if you can afford it, or if you intend to build many other electronic projects in the future, for your breadboard you should pick up one like this:

http://www.tequipment.net/Elenco9440.html?Source=Google

The Elenco 9440 is by far one of the best breadboards I have ever used. Yes, its expensive, but the massive area for prototyping can't be beat. You can get by with smaller boards, but when you try one of these, you'll wonder why you never bought it in the first place.

I have one, and I love it. In fact, I intend to purchase a couple more in the near future (you can't have too many).

:)

U could make your own breadboard arduino or buy a boarduino from adafruit... And why the mega? My decimelia works just fine :)... If I want more pins I'd just buy an ic to expand them... My 2 cents ;). Have fun

Why not the mega? More is better right? Actually looking at the cost I figured the mega was worth it for room to expand. I may re think that. I know my current app should fit on the nano, at least there is enough IO.

I was looking at encoders too, but for this app then I would have to build a display. May as well go with simple.

Building some faders into a box is one idea I was considering. That probably make the most sense.

Any one have a comment on using the same program on different boards? Do I have to prototype with the same chips?

Building some faders into a box is one idea I was considering. That probably make the most sense.

If you already know what you are going to mount them in for the final build, you might go ahead and put them in place, if you have a decent idea of where to put them, how they'll relate, and where other parts (switches, lights, buttons, etc) will go later.

If not - if you are building up to an idea (or the idea is vague in your head and you want to flesh it out "hands on" style), then build the faders into a temporary box of some sort, something you can modify/change/throw-out as your idea solidifies in the design.

Basically, the goal is to have an easy way to use the faders in a manner similar to the final design, while allowing easy access to the pins on the faders to build the prototype on the breadboard.

Any one have a comment on using the same program on different boards? Do I have to prototype with the same chips?

Provided you don't do all your coding on the SeeedMega exclusively to the point where your app grows larger than the Nano can support, you should be OK, other than possibly needing to alter pin reassignments between the two. Use defined constants for the pin numbers and such, whichever board you start with, and then when you move it over, you only need to change those constants (which should be defined at the top of your code file, or in a header file) to reflect the difference without needing to scan and alter a ton of code.

well I ordered the Seeeduino mega for my initial development. The nanoV3 would have been perfect (and is what I plan on using in the final project) however I robotshop and any place else seamed to be out of stock. I also ordered a danger shield and an encoder to try that out too. I also ordered some max485 chips and some max367 chips for DMX and isolation of inputs. The final project will end up on stage where some one could plug in some thing bad into the foot switch jack.

Thank you for your help, I am sure I will be back once all my stuff shows up.