Receptable without ground

I will be using this two things to extend the connection from my current plug location. However im wondering where should i connect the ground wire from 3 pin top to the receptable with no ground port


I will be using this two things to extend the connection from my current plug location. However I'm wondering where should i connect the ground wire from 3 pin top to the receptacle with no ground port.

I don't know what the thing in the top photo is, showing the back like that does not show what it is. What is it?

If the thing does not have a ground connection that is seriously worrying, replace it with a thing that does. If your appliance requires a ground then it is essential for your safety that you provide one.

nzmiii:
I will be using this two things to extend the connection from my current plug location. However im wondering where should i connect the ground wire from 3 pin top to the receptable with no ground port

Without knowing exactly what the two things are it is impossible to know whether they are double-insulated and can safely be used without an earth connection. Many appliances are double-insulated but for appliances that are not double-insulated an earth connection is essential.

...R

post a picture of the face of the receptacle.

and a picture of the label

and a link

if the plug fits there is a place to connect the wire to the third leg.

dave-in-nj:
if the plug fits there is a place to connect the wire to the third leg.

I was thinking the same: if it's a 3-pin 13A receptacle, then surely there must be an earth wire, otherwise (I would hope anyway) there would only be 2 holes on the front, for like a cell phone charger whatever that shape is called.

We also need views of the actual back and opposite side of that unit.

I think we know what the bottom one is. :grinning:

I suspect if the OP is asking these questions, they’re not the right person to be installing mains wiring.

No insurance cover, among other side-effects.

lastchancename:
I suspect if the OP is asking these questions, they’re not the right person to be installing mains wiring.

Very good point (i.e. I wish I had thought of it :slight_smile: )

The OP should consult a qualified electrician.

...R

PerryBebbington:
I don’t know what the thing in the top photo is, showing the back like that does not show what it is. What is it?

If the thing does not have a ground connection that is seriously worrying, replace it with a thing that does. If your appliance requires a ground then it is essential for your safety that you provide one.

Robin2:
Without knowing exactly what the two things are it is impossible to know whether they are double-insulated and can safely be used without an earth connection. Many appliances are double-insulated but for appliances that are not double-insulated an earth connection is essential.

…R

dave-in-nj:
post a picture of the face of the receptacle.

and a picture of the label

and a link

if the plug fits there is a place to connect the wire to the third leg.

meltDown:
I was thinking the same: if it’s a 3-pin 13A receptacle, then surely there must be an earth wire, otherwise (I would hope anyway) there would only be 2 holes on the front, for like a cell phone charger whatever that shape is called.

Paul__B:
We also need views of the actual back and opposite side of that unit.

I think we know what the bottom one is. :grinning:

I use this one, it is doubled insulated


Moderator edit: spammy link removed

That looks like a USB power supply such as one would use for charging a phone.

If it is double-insulated then it only needs to be connected to the line (brown) and neutral (blue) connections on the UK style plug.

However you really should consult an electrician in person and not rely on advice from people like me when you have no idea what their qualifications are (and, to be clear, I have NO electrical qualifications).

...R

OK, so now we know what the thing is and what you want to do with it. :grinning:

Yes, of course it is double-insulated, so you do not need a ground connection.

Many or most of us have done something like this to construct appliances - it used to be cheaper to do it that way but in practice, you are nowadays just as well off to simply buy a ready-made unit - as there are with USB "power boards".

What you would need to do is to buy a matching (plastic) mounting box for that fitting so that the connections are completely hidden. You then get a cord with a plug, fit it to the box using a "grip grommet" and wire the blue and brown only to that power converter inside the box.

Grip grommet:

Just an aside...
It’s worth noting that probably half of the ‘overseas’ mains-to-USB wall plates - like USB chargers - are NOT compliant with mains isolation requirements.

Failure of a single internal component can leave the USB connectors ‘live’.

Personally, I’d be suspicious if the manufacturer couldn’t find a way to ground the USB metalwork at the very least. One wire & one screw.

Always a concern, but one tends to think that local retailers will at least be held responsible for the products they sell. :roll_eyes: