Reducing payload size of nRF to achieve optimum range

I have read online that reducing the payload size of the message can dramatically increase range.

My question is what is the lowest amount of bytes I can send? And let's say I set it to 4 bytes -- my message cannot exceed 4 characters?

I read it here

I reckon you need to do your own tests, just like the guy in your link.

If you are using the ackPayload feature then dynamic payload size is automatically applied.

I have had a pair of low-power nRF24L01+ modules (with PCB antennas like the black one in the pictures in the link) working reliably at 110 metres range outdoors.

I can't immediately see how payload size matters, unless with a smaller payload there is less scope for errors.

...R

JeromeAriola:
I have read online that reducing the payload size of the message can dramatically increase range.

I am all for real world testing, but if reducing the size of a packet does increase range 'dramatically' there is something wrong with the modules.

If errors caused by noise etc are random then its true that at the limit of reception a long packet is more likely to suffer errors.

However due to the headers and trailers that are often added to the data portion of the packet, if you split a large packet into smaller ones, you will increase the overall amount of data sent (as there are more headers and trailers) and thus increase, not reduce, the chances of errors.