Remotely Controllable LCD for Office Do Not Disturb/On Call Sign?

I'm a bit geeky and am trying to make a remotely controllable LCD outside my office to a change it on the fly for when I'm on a call, in meeting, do not disturb. Is this even feasible to do for a Arduino newbie (haven't touch it yet but would consider if this is possible)? Some requirements:

  • controllable via usb, bluetooth, or wifi
  • max size of 4" x 6" LCD (I saw the earthlcd, but I don't know enough about Arduino)
  • distance from desk to outside door is about 15'
  • messages updating via PC/Mac or mobile device
  • need to quickly be able to switch the messages on the fly

Thanks...

A buddy suggested I should consider Raspberry Pi since it outputs to video easily and is a little computer which is more of what I'm trying to do. But any feedback, is appreciated.

Thanks...

Yeah, use a raspberry pi and screen. And use wifi dongle to connect to your wifi network. Remotely log in and type something up for display. Alternatively, set up a web server on your PC and have raspberry pi grab information from it with ajax.

ILikePrettyOutlets: A buddy suggested I should consider Raspberry Pi since it outputs to video easily and is a little computer which is more of what I'm trying to do. But any feedback, is appreciated.

Thanks...

Well, you can do it with Arduino. Arduino is also a little computer, just littler that a Raspberry Pi.

Do you really want to output Video, or do you just want an LCD screen with text on it? I suggest you want the latter. An Arduino with a wifi shield and an LCD shield could do what you want. Bear in mind that LCD shields often take up a lot of your pins, so if you do go the Arduino route, check the LCD pins used against the wifi pins used. You could also consider a Mega which has more pins available, as well as more space for you program.

What you can also have arduino do is to flip a sign with a servo motor that has Busy on one side and free on the other side. 8)

You could use one of these to control 4 Arduino pins with one or other of the 3 different receiver types (scroll down to the "May we also suggest...." part).

Depending on the state of the 4 pins you connect to, use ifs or switch case to choose the appropriate message.

(There is no radio side programming for those things: the key fob talks to the receiver, and all the receiver does is go high or low on the 4 pins. In that respect as far as Arduino's concerned, the keyfob buttons might as well be wired in.)