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You chose a high current, low impedance motor, so this is not a simple project. Cheap motor drivers based on the L29* chips won't work with it.

If you want to get the maximum torque and step rate available from the motor, you need a chopper motor driver capable of 1.7 amperes/winding.

There are none on the hobby market, but if you can do with slightly less torque, use this driver and carefully follow the directions to set the current limit to 1.5 amperes.

Also use a high voltage motor power supply (up to about 35 volts) capable of 2.5 or more amperes total.

Are there any advantages of using a power supply with a voltage rating above 12V?

Much faster step rates. See this introductory material: Stepper Motor - How Does a Stepper Motor Work? | Geckodrive

Will I also be able to drive two motors

No. If the motor current per winding is set to 1.5 amperes, you need about 2.5 amperes per motor at a minimum (the current does not add linearly as the motor drivers act like switching power supplies). So 5 amperes from the power supply at least.

jremington:
No. If the motor current per winding is set to 1.5 amperes, you need about 2.5 amperes per motor at a minimum (the current does not add linearly as the motor drivers act like switching power supplies). So 5 amperes from the power supply at least.

AFAIK it is a little more complex that that - as was pointed out to me by other contributors here.

The motor requires 1.7A at 3.4v or 5.78watt per coil - say 10 or 12 watts total. A 24v 4A power supply will provide 96 watts so it will easily power 2 motors. The driver chops the power so that the average power stays within the motor's limits.

Use large capacitors to deal with short term demand by the motors.

...R