Replace IR receiver with optocoupler?

Hi all,

I have an RGB LED strip, which I am connecting to my arduino via a mosfet relay board (here).

The RGB controller I have has an IR remote. I was thinking that I could add an IR receiver to my arduino, then take the signal from the remote to learn the codes. Then, rather than adding a IR transmitter to my arduino, could I use something like an optocoupler to transmit the signals?

Is this feasible?

This is the rgb controller:

Thanks

All feasible until you got to the opto coupler bit. That dosn't make sense. Try saying what you actually want to do.

I want to use the remote from the RGB controller, capture the signals with the arduino, then pass (some of) them to the RGB controller. I could use an IR led on my arduino, but would prefer to use a wired connection if possible.

Thanks

I think you need to know a lot more about your controller before you can consider that. Do you have a scope so you can look at the signals and voltages you have when it is working normally?

No, unfortunately not, this is my first attempt at electronics :(

The controller is just a cheap chinese ebay jobbie so finding out any more info will be nigh on impossible.

Guess I'll just have to mount an IR transmitter next to the rgb controller's IR receiver.

Thanks for your help

I'm a little confused: does the RGB LED board have an IR receiver to read the remote's signals? But you want to read those signals at the Arduino instead and only pass "some" of them to the RGB?

First thing I'd do, is try to interpret the signals from that remote, but without a 'scope to suss the carrier frequency you'd have to guess what IR receiver to but. I'd guess it's 38kHz purely because that's common, but it might not be the case. So you could buy a cheap IR receiver like this, and then use Ken Shirrif's library to print out what the codes are.

You may find the attachment to my thread here, of use.

Side note: spot the deliberate mistake of the B and R wires on that pic? ;)

JimboZA: I'm a little confused: does the RGB LED board have an IR receiver to read the remote's signals? But you want to read those signals at the Arduino instead and only pass "some" of them to the RGB?

Exactly.

JimboZA: First thing I'd do, is try to interpret the signals from that remote, but without a 'scope to suss the carrier frequency you'd have to guess what IR receiver to but. I'd guess it's 38kHz purely because that's common, but it might not be the case. So you could buy a cheap IR receiver like this, and then use Ken Shirrif's library to print out what the codes are.

Being a cheap chinese product, could one assume they would use the most common, and therefore cheapest components? 38kHZ sounds like a good starting block. I might just desolder the IR receiver from the rgb board.

JimboZA: You may find the attachment to my thread here, of use.

Thank you, I will take a look.

JimboZA: Side note: spot the deliberate mistake of the B and R wires on that pic? ;)

Haha no, I didn't notice. Dear oh dear.

paulharman:
Exactly.

So my supplementary question has to be, “why?”. I’m guessing to give you some further control? As it stands, any button will have an action on the RGBs, whereas you’ll be able to disallow some by not passing them on?

Exactly. The remote has some buttons which can assigned to DIY light sequences. I wont be using these, so I want to remap them to control other things on my arduino.

Most of those LED remotes seem to use the NEC IR protocol @ 38kHz.

Your suggesion about using an opto-coupler is possible. However, you would really need to: - have an oscilloscope or Logic Analyser - You could hack the IRremote library an change the "mark" and "space" finctions to provide de-modulated outputs instead of modulated outputs, which would feed into the output of the IR receiver. - be careful, IR receivers use inverted logic & you would have to allow for that in your design.

Alternatively, if the receiver for the light strip is concealed in a box, you could use the Arduino to receive all signals and then have an IR LED controlled by the arduino (inside the same box as the LED receiver), which just relays the signal you want to use for the LEDs. Seems like the simplest approach & also provides isolation.

In fact, you could just enclose the IR LED and the Receiver in a blob of blue-tac or play-doh! or just insulation tape as a physical shielding mechanism.