RESISTANCE INSTEAD OF SELENOID

I am trying to build a resistance (short circuit) circuit.I want to heat the resistor by giving a trigger from the arduino. The heated resistor will melt another cable. The battery I use will be an 11.1V 3500 mah Li-Po battery. I can’t change battery, I have to use that.
What kind of circuit should I built.
The circuit in the picture I shared is the circuit required to operate the solenoid. Instead of Vin, the surplus of 11.1V will come and it will merge with Arduino’s GND.

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The MOSFET has to be able to handle the current. (I assume that’s a MOSFET? And, I assume you’re are familiar with ?

Of course the battery has to supply the the current without the voltage dropping too much.

You don’t need the diode with a non-inductive load but you should add a couple of resistors to the gate. Here is a MOSFET driver circuit.

P.S.
Technically a “short circuit” is zero Ohms, or in practice it’s usually an unwanted connection of nearly zero Ohms. You can’t get heat without some resistance, but the lower the resistance the higher the current (Ohm’s Law). In the real world there is always some resistance but if the resistance is in the “wrong place”, the wrong thing can burn-up.

Power (related to heat) can be calculated 3 ways:
Power (Wattage) = Current (Amps) x Voltage
Power = V2/R
Power = Current2 x R

The temperature depends on how concentrated the heat/energy is. For example, 100W is enough to melt solder but it’s not enough to warm-up a room on a cold day.

And, you’ll probably melt your resistance wire before you melt the other wire unless the other wire is made of solder, or something like that.

And be careful “shorting-out” a Li-Po battery! You could kill the battery or start a fire! If it’s “battery assembly” if might have a thermal fuse that blows before a fire starts.

What exactly is this resistor that you are going to heat up enough to "melt another cable"? How much current does it take to do this? If you are seriously thinking of connecting it via a breadboard I suspect that the breadboard is going to melt first.

Steve

What exactly is this resistor that you are going to heat up enough to "melt another cable"? How much current does it take to do this? If you are seriously thinking of connecting it via a breadboard I suspect that the breadboard is going to melt first.

Yeah, if you want to melt everything including the breadboard, use a 10A power supply.
Not only will it melt, but most likely it will burst into flames and glow red (until you turn off the supply)

There is a mistake on that circuit you posted you have wired up the positive and negitave the wrong way round.

Good catch Mike.
I wonder if the OP wired it that way.

Has anybody noticed the solenoid is connected to
5V ? (or at least it was supposed to be if the
power wires hadn't been reversed)
And the gate is connected to D0 (Rx) ?