Resistor question here

Hi all,

I just saw this resistor kit in the store: Arduino Official Store | Boards Shields Kits Accessories
Unfortunately its out of stock but I had a question about the 0 ohm cable. Is it just a regular cable or a special cable that makes sure that it doesnt let trough any ohms?

Thanks in advance!

It's just wire, nothing special.

It's a piece of wire that looks like a resistor. They're used in the machines that fit components to pcbs, like if a jumper is required for some reason. The machines can't handle normal wire, so they use a 0 resistor which the machines can pick and place.

By the way, ohms don't get "let through". Coulombs are "let through" and that's what current is. Resistors, well, resist the passing of charge.

And the jumper wire included in the arduino pack isnt. So the jumper wire in this pack is a special wire that works as a resistor?

Twix536:
So the jumper wire in this pack is a special wire that works as a resistor?

No, it’s normal wire that looks like a resistor.

It’s a “resistor” that has a black band on it, black being the resistor colour code for “0”.

edit: pic added

0ohm.jpg

Twix536:
And the jumper wire included in the arduino pack isnt. So the jumper wire in this pack is a special wire that works as a resistor?

Yes it works as a resistor of zero ohms. Coincidentally the jumper wire in the Arduino pack also works as a resistor of zero ohms.

Now just stop there as the full explanation will get you even more confused. But ask if you want it.

Grumpy_Mike:
Yes it works as a resistor of zero ohms.

+- 5, 10, 20% depending on the tolerance. :stuck_out_tongue:

We used to wind up the purchasing department with that one :slight_smile:

By my calculations a short jumper wire like that would actually be about 0.0015
ohms. IE zero ohms for the vast majority of purposes you might think of.

The only way to get true zero ohms is with superconductors.

No such thing as a zero ohm cable LOL. Sounds like clever marketing to me. In reality it is just so low it is not worth considering. Most cables are probably that way unless they are very long.

Twix536:
or a special cable that makes sure that it doesnt let trough any ohms?

You feind. My sides are splitting and I have tears rolling down my face. :smiley:

jarrod0987:
Sounds like clever marketing to me.

No, these things are very useful in professional electronics. They allow you to lay out PCBs with options, that is alternative functions that can be switched in and out when you are prototyping, they also tend to be left in on final production " just in case".

Would it look cooler if you connect two parts (like a bridge on top of a highway - currents don't get mixed up and wouldn't make shorts ) with a piece of wire or use a resistor ? Of course a resistor looks cooler and you won't have wires going everywhere . So you'd use these .

jarrod0987:
No such thing as a zero ohm cable LOL. Sounds like clever marketing to me. In reality it is just so low it is not worth considering. Most cables are probably that way unless they are very long.

Yes .
Nothing is 0 Ohms (absolute zero) or infinite Ohms .
Professional marketing ?! I think buying this resistor is cheaper than buying a piece of wire to use instead .

And here I thought that they were giving you a special superconducting cable that comes with its own dewar flask to keep it at one degree above absolute zero. :slight_smile:

Rob Rothman

Professional marketing ?! I think buying this resistor is cheaper than buying a piece of wire to use instead

No it is because you can put them in auto insertion machines, you can't do that with wire.
They are more useful with surface mount parts.

Still if you have never been in professional electronics then it might be hard to see it's usefulness. But it has saved many a "Cad spin" and even rescued some units in production.

So the jumper wire can be used as a resistor.
I’m trying to make a pause and play by using the arduino

In the image below is how it looks like.

In the code

int led = 7;
int fsr = A5;
int phone = 10;

void setup() {
  Serial.begin(9600);
  pinMode(led, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(phone, OUTPUT);
  digitalWrite(phone, HIGH);
  digitalWrite(led, HIGH);
}

void loop() {
  int fsrRead = analogRead(fsr);
  Serial.println(fsrRead);
  if(fsrRead > 100){
    digitalWrite(led, LOW);
    digitalWrite(phone, LOW);
  } else {
    digitalWrite(phone, HIGH);
    digitalWrite(led, HIGH);
  }
 delay(500); 
}

fsr is the pressure sensor.
When the pressure sensor is higher than 100 it will put the MIC OUTPUT LINE TO THE PHONE TOO LOW.
And the led is to check if if the code works.
The led is working but putting the mic output signal cable line to low is not working.
Unless i remove the cable by hand. When i put the cable back in the breadboard it is not playing the song again.

So the jumper wire can be used as a resistor.

No they are not resistors they are always jump wires.

Basically its just a wire that looks like a resistor .

Arman5592:
Basically its just a wire that looks like a resistor .

As established in the first two replies a few days back, yep.