RF motor controller

I am looking for some advice about what rf controller and motor controller to use to build a speed control for a 12/24 V dc motor. I have seen a few posts on doing this with a 433mhz controller and an L298 H bridge controller. The motor is to be used on a rod wrapping lathe so there will not be a lot of torque or load placed on the motor. I plan on using a 500 RPM DC gear motor for this project either 12 or 24 volts.

Any advice greatly appreciated.

In what way, specifically, did the posts you mention not address your needs?

Why would you need to have wireless control for a "rod wrapping lathe" - it would be much easier with wired control.

You need to identify the motor before you can consider what motor controller would be appropriate. The important consideration is the stall current of the motor.

...R

aarg:
In what way, specifically, did the posts you mention not address your needs?

They all used the same RF 433 and the same motor controller. I was just curious if there was a better combination.

Robin2:
Why would you need to have wireless control for a "rod wrapping lathe" - it would be much easier with wired control.

You need to identify the motor before you can consider what motor controller would be appropriate. The important consideration is the stall current of the motor.

...R

There are two ways to control the speed normally. Most commercial wrappers us sewing machine motors with foot controller. I have used that type of motor and in fact have two or three sewing machine motors that I can use, but I cannot reverse these without tearing the motor down to switch the brushes. I have also used a 120V light controller to adjust the speed in combination with the foot controller. That works as well, and in fact is a good way to put an upper limit on the motor speed. The problem with this method is, as already said, the motor can't be reversed, and I don't get the really fine speed control I need using the foot controller.

What I want to do is use a DC motor to drive the power head. That gives me the ability to change direction either with switch (DPDT) or programmatically with the Arduino. I have built several rod dryers with dc gear motors and an inexpensive motor controllers, and used Arduinos and the L 298 to do the same thing. But I have not found an easy way to use a foot controller to control the speed. I have built wow wow type foot controllers and connected them to variable pots, but these are not very easy to build and connect, but once done they do provide the control I need.

All that having been said, I have seen several power heads with RF controllers (actually they use the same controller used to control LED lights, similar to what I did the the 120v light dimmer). But these have issues with controlling the speed at the low end. What I want is a controller that give me a little finer speed control at the low end.

The motors I am considering are 12/24 VDC and a max of 2A. I will be powering the motor with a stand alone power supply and a buck regulator to drop the voltage to power the Arduino. All the Arduino will do is provide the RF interface for speed control. I think it will give me the response I need as well as the fine speed control for rod wrapping.

The more I think about it, I think I need to use an IR receiver not an RF module.

If a foot controller is acceptable then why not just use a simple potentiometer that you rotate by hand. That can work with a bi-directional motor either by using the centre of the potentiomenter as the OFF position or by supplementing the potentiometer with a direction switch.

On the other hand if you have a suitable IR remote control there is an Arduino library (by Ken Shriff, I think) that can interpret signals from various models.

My concept of rod-wrapping is that you just need to set the speed and leave it alone - maybe count the turns. I can't envisage the need for any form of remote control that can be operated, for example, from the other side of the room for from outside the building.

...R

Robin2:
If a foot controller is acceptable then why not just use a simple potentiometer that you rotate by hand. That can work with a bi-directional motor either by using the centre of the potentiomenter as the OFF position or by supplementing the potentiometer with a direction switch.

On the other hand if you have a suitable IR remote control there is an Arduino library (by Ken Shriff, I think) that can interpret signals from various models.

My concept of rod-wrapping is that you just need to set the speed and leave it alone - maybe count the turns. I can't envisage the need for any form of remote control that can be operated, for example, from the other side of the room for from outside the building.

...R

Thanks for you thoughtful reply.

But, not really, speed control is important. When you start the motor to rotate the rod you don't want it to start at the wrapping speed. That works fine for wrapping wire coils, but not wrapping fishing rods. You want to be able to gradually bring the speed up to a comfortable speed for wrapping. That's to allow the wrapper to control the wrapping thread so it lays on the rod properly. That speed will vary depending on what you are wrapping, a long under wrap for instance might require a high speed whereas a guide wrap might require a lower speed since you are wrapping a short distance. This is normally achieved using a foot control so you have both hands free. Use of a pot requires a wired arrangement to keep the pot close to the wrapping area and also use of one hand to increase and decrease the speed. The extra wires laying on the wrapping area just adds to the clutter. A remote IR controller eliminates the need for a wired solution and gives me much more precise control over the speed as well as options that I can control from a distance (maybe a couple of feet) from the power head. When wrapping I could be as far away as 10 or 12 feet from the power head.

Add to that the ability to use the same controller for a rod dryer that I can control from a distance and now have new vistas open. I can also think about using stepper motors remotely for other projects as well as for drying machines.

Thanks for the information on Ken's library.