right motor for robot mower

Good evening.
I am planning a lawnmower robot and wondered what could be the best motor to be used to drive the blade. Better brushless or brushed. What kind? In direct contact with or connected to a belt or a gear system?
Thanks in advance

What size blade? How fast to spin it? Mulching or normal?

I am considering whether to use one or more engines, and then one or more blades. For now I would be inclined to put several motors in order to reduce the strain. The robot should be wide approximately 40 / 50cm. So I would say 3 blades 20 cm each. I was also considering the idea of putting the engines in two rows and multiple heights. One in front of highest to give a first trimmed grass and two behind lower for the final cut. Normal not muching. With regard to the speed I have no idea

The requirements for the motor are set by the mechanical requirements of the blade system you use,
so we would only be guessing blindly.

Well then to be more specific divide the two cases . That motor would be better I used with a normal to the cutting blade of about 35 cm width ?
And which engine would be fine for a cutting blade but also for normal width 15 / 20 cm ?

You need to know more about the mechanical aspects of the system before you can select the correct motors. You will need to find out the mass of the blades and the speed at which you need to turn them.

These two values (mass and velocity) will give you an angular momentum. You will then need to calculate the force required to achieve this angular momentum (F=ma) and choose a motor that is capable of supplying this torque value. For a mower, probably the most important thing you need is speed rather than precision, so I would go for a DC motor as opposed to a brushless or stepper motor. Whether you use direct drive or belts depends on what speed and force the motor requires. That decision depends mostly on your other design issues, such as power source, duration etc.

I would also imaging that as grass/debris builds up, the force required would increase, so you would have to build in a certain over design.

For a metal cutting blade, the required force will probably be quite high, so expect to have to use a large motor drawing a large current.

The idea was to use the blades of a cutter fixed firmly to the drive shaft or use of the wires attached to the shaft as a trimmers.
I thought so at a dc motor. But if I choose one high power so that a high power consumption such as control? a motor driver I stand high current begins to be quite expensive ....... there are other possibilities?

You could use a relay if you only want on/off control.

I do not know much about the subject. What could be a relay compatible with Arduino suitable for a high-powered motor-powered 12v?I am looking on the internet I found modules with a maximum current of 10 A. they are sufficient or are there better?

You have to actually measure the power needed with a set up like this, standard mechnics equations
don't deal with grass cutting blade loading! Why not find out what commercial lawnmotors use (motors
and blade configurations). This is an Arduino forum, not a grass-cutting forum, you may find more experience
elsewhere.

I have searched and researched in other forums and in general over the internet. But since my goal is to make everything work through Arduino was hoping someone could give me ideas and advice on what to choose. which engine I can control more easily and securely. how to put everything together and to communicate motor and sensor with Arduino. In fact, the blades and the cut itself is a secondary thing, I'm interested above all the engine and how to control it with the microprocessor

You have to choose the motor though, then get the right driver - for instance here’s a cordless
lawnmower with specifications that might be a guide:

http://www.bricovideo.ovh/video/produits/florabest-lidl/uk/florabest-cordless-lawnmower-lidl-frma-36v-test-advice-price-manual-technical-data-video.html

For cutting grass with a conventional push mower design you might look at a mars or motenergy etek motor.
http://www.motenergy.com/me0909.html
Based on a briggs and stratton motor I think. For any real grass cutting I would be looking at 3kW and above (at least the grass around here). I have a gas pushmower just over 5hp and about 6 ft-lbs of torque .. it still bogs down in heavy grass.

A string trimmer might be a little easier to drive, safer and has some built in self protection in case of unexpected foreign objects.

I would suggest buying an electric lawnmower and then modifying it to be controlled with the Arduino. You are trying to invent too many things in an area in which you clearly have little experience or expertise.

these are definitely too powerful motors. In fact, my idea and costrire a robot walk every day and therefore must cut short a time grass being then subjected to little effort.

Plenty of specs for the venerable Elec-Trak electric mower if you're looking for guidelines on motor size. Spoiler: these used ~.6 HP electric motors with 18" blades.

For smaller diameter blades I'd highly recommend the diamond-shaped blades you'll find for weed trimmers.

Regarding blade speed I think there's a lot of leeway available; don't overthink it. The limit for blade speed for a commercial mower is 16,000 feet per minute at the blade tip but then that speed is most applicable to the very large, "brush hog" type of mowers.

I am fed up by seeing my home backyard looking bushy with an overgrown lawn. I need to buy a zero turn mower for my lawn which is more consistent and easy to use.I read a post https://topreviewedten.com/best-commercial-zero-turn-mower/ where i found two best zero turn mower like Poulan Pro and Husqvarna. please suggest me which one to buy.

I want to buy a zero turn mower for my lawn. I am fed up by using old traditonal mowers it is difficult to cut long grasses. I read a post Best Commercial Zero Turn Mower for the Money 2021 – Top Reviewed Ten where i found two best types of lawn mowers like Poulan Pro and Husqvarna. Please suggest me the best one out of these.