Robust Welding

Hello everybody.

I hace a very simple, but important question I hope anyone experienced can answer.

I am working on a project that is going to be used in a not very suitable place. I mean that is going to be placed in a car or lorry so its going to be vibrating, maybe moving. This means I need very robusto welding, because I do not want to waste my time reparing things.

Basically I am going to use a controller with some sensores, that hace to be solded to de controller. I have heard about some boards where sensores can be easily connect to controller. I will like people to give me more options. For example some hardware interfaces that can be connect to microstrip board easily (may be not need to weld) and to a tipicall conector such as BNC, RCA... I will like to avoid as much manual work as I could: because I like programming :slight_smile:

Thank you everyone.

There's other ways of fixating components next to soldering.
The soldering needs to be done, because you need to have good contacts.
You can fix the components by casting the finished and tested PCB in epoxy.
Do a search on "casting epoxy" on this site.
You will find some valuable threads where people tell about their experiences and thoughts on this.

We don't weld electronic components, we solder. :wink:

The vibration in an automobile isn't that bad. A normal circuit board can be mounted in a car with no problems. Most connectors will work in a car also. I'm sure you've had a phone or computer in your car and you might have transported a TV or some stereo equipment, and you didn't worry about vibration.

Heat and cold are sometimes more of a problem, and moisture & condensation if the electronics are mounted in the engine compartment.

I've actually got a car alarm built on a plug-in breadboard that I build about 20 years ago! It's still working fine.

Thanks, both of you. First I said weld because is what the translator said but I mean soldering.

You are right, maybe vibrations un the car isnt that bad. But I will like to learn it. One of the things it can be done is use coaxial conector, that isis really robust. But I will like to know others people experiencia.

Thanks.

DVDdoug:
We don't weld electronic components, we solder. :wink:

Here, in France and I expect in a number of other languages, the word for welding and for soldering is the same. It caused me some confusion when I first moved here.

Russell.

The distinction is that a weld uses molten metal of the same type as you are trying to join, where as soldering uses a molten metal that is not the same as the metals you are trying to join.

There are several types of soldering, in electronics we use soft soldering. Other soldering types are hard soldering brazing and silver soldering, but there is no silver involved in that one.

russellz:
Here, in France and I expect in a number of other languages, the word for welding and for soldering is the same. It caused me some confusion when I first moved here.

I find that absolutely bizarre! How do engineers operate if they cannot communicate what they are doing?

My suspicion has always been that people actually employed in the trade or industry use suitably descriptive language, but the translators simply do not know the language.

A quick bit of language research reveals the problem. Our English word "solder" which is never used to indicate a welding process, is apparently derived from the Latin root of "solid" or alternatively "unalloyed", which then makes perfect sense. So the English term is in essence misleading.

Nevertheless, I should be surprised if French and other speakers cannot somehow distinguish the assembly of electronic circuits, from this:

This welding/soldering item has been addressed enough by now to my taste.
If you see someone from France, Spain or Asia, the regular visitors here should know by now about this, and that that word "welding" should be read as "soldering".
Is it so hard to do that ?
Remember that you are on an international forum and that not everyone has a perfect English vocabulary.

Grumpy_Mike:
Other soldering types are hard soldering brazing and silver soldering, but there is no silver involved in that one.

Sorry Mike, can't let that one go. Silver solder does contain silver. I have several different grades of silver solder in my workshop and they contain anything up to 55% silver. I've been using it to build a high pressure boiler for a model steam locomotive.

Russell.

Silver solder does contain silver.

Well I am only going off what my metal work teacher told us when I was at school. Mind you that is some years ago so things might have changed.

Or the metalwork teacher was exemplifying the old aphorism.

To get back to the OP's topic...

...if what you are building has to undergo more vibration than what you would typically see on today's automobiles (at least inside the cabin) - then you need something more than soldering.

This has historically meant a more "mechanical" process like wire-wrapping. Proper wire-wrapping can actually create stronger joints than soldering.

It is more expensive in the long run due to the parts, tools, and time it takes - plus, you still have the problem of what to do with anything other than ICs (wire-wrapping discrete components is virtually impossible) or SMT components. There are work-arounds, but most involve soldering - which is what you are trying to get away from.

Reply #1 was the correct one for severe vibration but unless you are putting that circuit in a racing car or fighter plane it should not be necessary. Normal soldering is fine for automobile work. If you have any particularly big components (relays, transformers, etc.) they should be fixed mechanically as well.

Russell.

Grumpy_Mike:
Well I am only going off what my metal work teacher told us when I was at school. Mind you that is some years ago so things might have changed.

Perhaps he was trying to stop pupils nicking it :slight_smile: .
Yes it has changed, the cadmium content has been removed by the safety police and it no longer flows so well into small gaps!

Russell.

cr0sh:
This has historically meant a more "mechanical" process like wire-wrapping. Proper wire-wrapping can actually create stronger joints than soldering.

This is a good option. Another option I found is and IDC connector to a bus i2C. It will implies welding the IDC header.

russellz:
Sorry Mike, can't let that one go. Silver solder does contain silver. I have several different grades of silver solder in my workshop and they contain anything up to 55% silver. I've been using it to build a high pressure boiler for a model steam locomotive.

Russell.

And its still a rip off.

500g reel of solder at 3% silver has less than 5 ukp worth of silver in it , but its silver, hey lets charge twice the price.

At school , metalwork teacher used to alloy and draw his own silver solder.

Boardburner2:
500g reel of solder at 3% silver has less than 5 ukp worth of silver in it , but its silver, hey lets charge twice the price.

That's not silver solder. It's a soft solder containing a small percentage of silver. Silver solder is a hard (high temperature) solder used for strong mechanical rather than electrical jointing. Cup Alloys are my favourite supplier.

It is expensive but only tiny quantities are needed as it flows into gaps of between 0.05 mm and 0.2 mm.

Russell.

Yes im aware of that.

Thanks for the link , those prices are much better than i get locally , by 50%!