Rookie question: bridging power output

So I’m completely new to Arduino so pardon me for the rookie question. Apparently I’m also blind because neither forum nor Google searches turned up anything.

On the power outputs on the one side (above the Analog In), I have 2x 5v headers and 2x GND headers. I want to connect multiple devices (more than there are headers) and while I understand that you can hook multiple devices to the same header (provided you don’t try to draw too much current), I don’t want a bunch of wires (the sensor/control box needs to be in a separate enclosure) coming out.

So is it possible to bridge the two 5v together, and then the same to the GND? Or will that cause a short somewhere? Attached is a quick drawing of what I’m proposing. Side question: what’s the difference between the GND headers on this side and the single GND header on the opposite side?

I think you really blind :smiley:

Where you find two 5V from the headers?

the headers only have Vin, Gnd, Gnd, 5V, 3.3V

All the GND pin are connected together, they are same.

You took the words out of my keyboard…

Maybe you need this: (see attached)

So is it possible to bridge the two 5v together, and then the same to the GND?

NO.
That might have something to do with the fact that there is only one 5V pin on the header.
As far as the GNDs, you’re too late. It’s already been done. (by the mfg)

Here you go. Unless one of these two headers is lying to me, I see two of them.

EDIT: Since I guess it’s not supposed to have 2x 5v in the first place, maybe that’s why I couldn’t find anything with a search.

It's already done. There's only one regulator. How could you have two pins that come from the same regulator without them being connected ? (you can check it with a meter if you want)

raschemmel: It's already done. There's only one regulator. How could you have two pins that come from the same regulator without them being connected ? (you can check it with a meter if you want)

Ah, I was not aware there was only one regulator (like I said, I'm a newb with this stuff). Good to know I can bridge the two 5v. That'll streamline the process if I don't have to watch mA draw as closely. Thanks!

majhi: Ah, I was not aware there was only one regulator (like I said, I'm a newb with this stuff). Good to know I can bridge the two 5v. That'll streamline the process if I don't have to watch mA draw as closely. Thanks!

What he is saying is that there is only one 5v source and both pins come from that same source so bridging will not help.

Exactly what the previous post said, the bridging wire you have put in your diagram has already been done on the PCB so there is no point.

Alright, definitely good to know. Thank you, all! It looks like the max current is 800mA so I should be fine. I won't be driving a whole lot from the board.

FYI,
The 5V pin is obviously designed to support 800 mA. The standard procedure is to have a Power Bus that
consists of two solid copper wires (or traces) , that everything gets connected to. Generally this is the breadboard red & blue color coded pin rows on the outside edge of the breadboard. For a hand soldered
perfboard, it’s a 22 ga to 20 ga. solid coper wire running along the outside of the underside of the board.
For terminal strip layouts it’s a terminal strip with jumpers on one side so a group of pins are shorted together, (five or ground, five for + 5V on a ten terminal strip). On a pcb, it’s a pair of traces with pads
coming off them to connect to.