Rugged Motor Driver Shield

Rugged Circuits has released its latest shield, the Rugged Motor Driver for the Arduino Uno, Mega, and Duemilanove (and compatible boards).

Features: - Dual Texas Instruments DRV8801 40V 2.8A H-bridges - Controls one bipolar stepper motor or two brush DC motors - Simple enable/direction interface uses only 4 Arduino pins - Fully protected against reverse voltage, overcurrent, overtemperature, electrostatic discharge, and shorted motor leads - Twice the actual current output compared to comparable L298-based drivers - Motors powered from Arduino Vin input or external 8V-30V DC input terminal block - External 8V-30V DC input terminal can power the Arduino (max. 15V) - Stacking headers allow another shield to plug in on top or plug in bare wires to make use of unused I/O pins - Fully assembled and ready to use -- no terminals or pin headers to buy - Also usable as a standalone motor driver using optional 6-pin terminal block connector

Please see the product page. The cost is $23.95 assembled (not a kit).

Looks excellent. I’ve seen a couple of these motor shields get released within the last couple of months.

The price seems to be respectable.

I’m not trying to be negative, and I also don’t know the function of them, but the two electrolytic capacitors in the center of the board…

Would it cost that much more to put in a pair of quality Nichicon, Chemi-Con, Rubycon, or hell even Teapos in there? When I look at any piece of circuitry, one of the first thing I look at, especially if it has to do with power delivery, is the capacitors.

But set this aside, it looks to be very well made. Good soldering it appears. If it can put out what it is speced to put out, I would be pretty impressed.

Would it cost that much more to put in a pair of quality Nichicon, Chemi-Con, Rubycon, or hell even Teapos in there? When I look at any piece of circuitry, one of the first thing I look at, especially if it has to do with power delivery, is the capacitors.

I'm not sure what specific manufacturer was sourced but I can assure you we only buy name-brand components from authorized distributors :)

-- The Quick Shield: breakout all 28 pins to quick-connect terminals

No I'm not saying they are bad but if you are paying for good quality components, you might as well use some that people have heard of and have come to expect good quality from.

It's not as important in your application, but say you were designing a power supply, I'd feel 100x more comfortable having a Rubycon capacitor than a random Chinese capacitor company. Names don't nessecarily mean better but they sometimes can make people feel like they have a reliable product. Plus you can advertise that you are using high quality caps from (brand name x). Marketting I guess.

Well what do I know. Just something that I like to see, but of course, most of the world doesn't give a rats butt about those kind of things.

Cheers. :)