Scaling down voltage regulator's resistors from 0603 down to 0402 is it safe?

Hi All, I have few voltage regulators I have built in my learning process, mostly I built them on 0603 package size for resistors and 0805 or 1206 for capacitors.
Now I want to scale it down a little bit so I can fit everything on smaller PCB space, while inductor, diode and capacitor package sizes is a straightforward choice, I am a bit concerned about resistors, I know resistor can handle only so much power and the smaller the size the less power it can handle, I think for 0402 those are like 1/10 1/16 or less Watt, will it be safe to use resistors of such low power rating?

I am particularly interested in SC4501 voltage regulator tunes up to output 12V at 150mA, in the attached illustration I circled in red resistors that I want to scale down to 0402, is it safe to go that size? How much power is going through those resistors?

Please keep in mind that I am still a noob and missing alot of theoretical knowledge, that’s why I am stuck with this resistor question, I am not quite sure at what parameters in the datasheet to look at to determine how much current is going thought those resistors to calculate power.

For example Rosc(R4) is the resistor that sets operating frequency, in the datasheet I can’t quite find what voltage/current is going through Rosc resistor and as far as I understand I need to know Voltage/Current so I can figure out voltage drop across resistor, thus how much power it handles?

Or for Feedback divider (R1 R2), there are two resistors R1 = 174k and R2 = 20k, if I calculated it correct here then we are looking at 0.000666 and 0.000077 Watt for R1 and R2, which is well under 1/16 or 1/20 Watt resistor rating? Did I get this right?

Can you please push me in right direction?

sc4501.JPG

A 0402 resistor is rated for 1/16 W
see http://www.resistorguide.com/resistor-sizes-and-packages/

The chain has a total resistance of 174 + 20 = 194K
At 12V this means the current down the chain is 0.062 mA or 62uA.

So a 174K resistor with 62uA going through it ( I2R ) = 0.00067 W
So that is OK, now you calculate the power for the 20K resistor.

Higher wattage rated 0402 parts are available also if needed, altho the voltages being discussed do not seem to indicate that is needed here.
174K, 0.1W
http://www.digikey.com/product-search/en/resistors/chip-resistor-surface-mount/65769?k=resistor&k=&pkeyword=resistor&pv1=221&FV=fff40001%2Cfff800e9%2C142c07b9&mnonly=0&newproducts=0&ColumnSort=0&page=1&stock=1&quantity=0&ptm=0&fid=0&pageSize=25
20K, 0.1W and 0.2W
http://www.digikey.com/product-search/en/resistors/chip-resistor-surface-mount/65769?k=resistor&k=&pkeyword=resistor&pv1=295&FV=fff40001%2Cfff800e9%2C142c07b9&mnonly=0&newproducts=0&ColumnSort=0&page=1&stock=1&quantity=0&ptm=0&fid=0&pageSize=25

You can solder 0402 parts yet can't calculate V-squared-over-R?? I find that very odd.

I've lost more 402's in the carpet than I've successfully soldered... just saying,