Screws and Standoffs for upside down boards

Hi all,

In my project I have to hang upside down these boards:

(with a hole of about 3mm)

(with a hole of about 2mm)

My idea is to find some quite long threaded standoffs to be glued at their bottom to the "project roof" and screwed to the boards

Could you please suggest me some products you have used in the past or some other solutions?

Thanks in advance

Bjack795:
Hi all,

In my project I have to hang upside down these boards:

(with a hole of about 3mm)

(with a hole of about 2mm)

My idea is to find some quite long threaded standoffs to be glued at their bottom to the "project roof" and screwed to the boards

Could you please suggest me some products you have used in the past or some other solutions?

Thanks in advance

Why does it make a difference which way they are mounted. Standoffs are standoffs. And why use glue? If really necessary, try 5 minute epoxy.

Paul

Paul_KD7HB:
Why does it make a difference which way they are mounted. Standoffs are standoffs. And why use glue? If really necessary, try 5 minute epoxy.

Paul

I give all the details, the base of the standoffs must be large enough to be glued.
I use glue for this because it's a "beta project" so that the standoffs could be deglued in the future.
I will try epoxy in the future, thanks for the suggestion!

Do you know any standoff for my purpose?

Bjack795:
Hi all,

In my project I have to hang upside down these boards:

(with a hole of about 3mm)

Question 2.

Why do you want the display mounted upside down?

Most people would use standoffs or screws and mount it right side up so you can read it. Personally I use a M2.5x25 screw and a couple of M2.5 nuts as spacers to recess the display flush with the enclosure.

(see how silly it gets when clear responses are not supplied)

adwsystems:
Why do you want the display mounted upside down?

Most people would use standoffs or screws and mount it right side up so you can read it.

(see how silly it gets when clear responses are not supplied)

It is mounted inside a opening and closing case so when it's closed the screen is upside down, when it's open you can read the display.

My d32 has 2 mm hole so I can't use M2.5

Bjack795:
My d32 has 2 mm hole so I can't use M2.5

I said the display was mounted with M2.5. Use a smaller screw.

Question 3.

So you have a book-style or hinged enclosure?

Bjack795:
I give all the details, the base of the standoffs must be large enough to be glued.
I use glue for this because it’s a “beta project” so that the standoffs could be deglued in the future.
I will try epoxy in the future, thanks for the suggestion!

Do you know any standoff for my purpose?

Sure. For your project use pieces of wooden dowels. In the US we have Gorilla glue and it would work and if the other surface is smooth and non-absorbant, the standoff will pop off with a bit of work.

Paul

adwsystems:
Question 3.

So you have a book-style or hinged enclosure?

It is an old case of a screwdriver so it is plastically hinged.

What is the project "roof" made from? Can you put screws into it?

I use small woodscrews to hold circuit boards with a piece of plastic tubing as a spacer. You can cut the tubing to whatever length is needed?

If you can't put screws into the "roof" maybe you can glue a suitable piece of wood to the roof and put the screws into that?

...R

Bjack795:
It is an old case of a screwdriver so it is plastically hinged.

You didn't put that in the OP. Explains a lot.

So when the case is open you can see the boards right side up. Mount them with stand offs just like any other project. From the bottom of the board to the inside of the case. Standard standoffs and screws. I'm not seeing an issue. Been there done that, I hinged two project boxes together to make a similar enclosure that was 'just the right size.

I was looking for the pieces not for a solution for the upside down problem.
Anyway the wooden dowels screwed with an electric screwdriver seems to be the best solution

Bjack795:
My idea is to find some quite long threaded standoffs to be glued at their bottom to the "project roof" and screwed to the boards

Could you please suggest me some products you have used in the past or some other solutions?

Bjack795:
I was looking for the pieces not for a solution for the upside down problem.
Anyway the wooden dowels screwed with an electric screwdriver seems to be the best solution

You asked for both, but without a complete description no one could give you either.

Grainger, Home Depot, Lowe's, Ace Hardware, Hillman, Crown Bolt, McMaster-Carr, Amazon, and eBay all carry the pieces you need (I know, I have used them all)

adwsystems:
You asked for both, but without a complete description no one could give you either.

Grainger, Home Depot, Lowe's, Ace Hardware, Hillman, Crown Bolt, McMaster-Carr, Amazon, and eBay all carry the pieces you need (I know, I have used them all)

Other solutions like the wooden dowels one, not for the upside down problem

I have searched there but I didn't find the standoffs with 1 mm of inner threaded diameter

I've used screw anchors. Easy to cut to length. Not for really heavy stuff.

dougp:
I've used screw anchors. Easy to cut to length. Not for really heavy stuff.

I haven't found them with 1 mm of diameter of the screw

I use nylon standoffs from McMaster-Carr for mounting circuit boards. They are to mechanical things as digikey is to components - a massive selection and incredible logistics, with a great website for searching/filtering their products.

Arguments can be made between hotmelt glue vs epoxy. I usually pick the former, but I do occasionally have to fix the glue joints (on the other hand, unlike epoxy, it's easy to do that).

Bjack795:
Other solutions like the wooden dowels one, not for the upside down problem

I have searched there but I didn't find the standoffs with 1 mm of inner threaded diameter

Ask a vague question, get lots of answers.

Where did 1mm come form? You listed 3mm for the display and 2mm for the Wemos D32.

What is the actual size of the hole in the Wemos D32 (in metric and SAE)? Have you tested the fit of a 2-56 screw in the mounting hole?

DrAzzy:
I use nylon standoffs from McMaster-Carr for mounting circuit boards. They are to mechanical things as digikey is to components - a massive selection and incredible logistics, with a great website for searching/filtering their products.

Arguments can be made between hotmelt glue vs epoxy. I usually pick the former, but I do occasionally have to fix the glue joints (on the other hand, unlike epoxy, it's easy to do that).

I have found something interesting there, could you explain to me the hex size 0-80 etc..
What do these numbers mean?
To understand the inside diameter size

adwsystems:
Ask a vague question, get lots of answers.

Where did 1mm come form? You listed 3mm for the display and 2mm for the Wemos D32.

What is the actual size of the hole in the Wemos D32 (in metric and SAE)? Have you tested the fit of a 2-56 screw in the mounting hole?

The hole is 2 mm
So I need like 1 mm or a little bit more

So if the hole is 2mm in diameter, why not use a M2 standoff and M2 screw. And if your case is plastic just heat up the standoff with a lighter and then just sink the thread into the plastic, saves all the drilling and it will make a nice thread so you can unscrew it. I have draws of m2,3,4,5 screws and standoffs but not M1, again your need M2 and the screws to match, plus a plastic spacer.

RS components - M2 Standoffs

Ebay seller with may sizes of Nylon standoffs

Farnell standoffs

KawasakiZx10r:
So if the hole is 2mm in diameter, why not use a M2 standoff and M2 screw. And if your case is plastic just heat up the standoff with a lighter and then just sink the thread into the plastic, saves all the drilling and it will make a nice thread so you can unscrew it. I have draws of m2,3,4,5 screws and standoffs but not M1, again your need M2 and the screws to match, plus a plastic spacer.

RS components - M2 Standoffs

Ebay seller with may sizes of Nylon standoffs

Farnell standoffs

I will try with the M2 but in my opinion the hole is a little bit smaller (like 1.9 ) because my 2 mm screw was a little bit too big.

Anyway I found this for my question on the 0-80 hex size

The larger number (the 56 in 2-56) denotes the number of threads per inch. The smaller number (the 2 in
2-56) denotes the maximum width of the screw body, including the threads. The system is rather indirect but
if you take 0 (as in 0-80), that 0 stands in for .060 of an inch. As you go larger, add 13 thousandths of an
inch, so the body of the screw in a 1-72 screw is actually 73 thousandths (.073) inch. My 2-56 screws are 86
thousandths of an inch in diameter, with 56 threads to the inch. Similarly, as you double up on 0s, you sub-
tract .013, so a 00-90 screw is 47 thousandths of an inch in diameter, with 90 threads to the inch.