Securing a breadboard

So I got an Arduino starting kit a while back and I finally am getting around to working with it. The kit came with a little breadboard and I want to use it but there is one problem. I am working on a project that I want to actually use (not just play with every now and then) so I am putting it in a project box but the breadboard that came with the kit doesn’t have any mounting points so I am trying to find the best way to secure it in the project box.

I currently have three options that I can think of:

  • Using the “valley” that goes down the center and running some sort of wire or string down it and then securing the wire/string. If I do this then it will be easier to move the breadboard into a different project box if the need arises
  • using some sort of adhesive (ether double stick tape or glue), while it will be more secure if I do need to upgrade to a larger project box it will be a pain to move (in fact I would probably just buy a new breadboard)
  • Just biting the bullet and buying a new breadboard with mounting hardware (I would prefer not to do this as I have already sunk quite some time in this and I don’t want to wait for delivery)

Thanks

Double sided tape is what I would try, the thicker kind.

Sounds like you have it under control.

Mabe learn to use:
http://www.roadrunnerelectronics.com/epages/BT3782.sf/en_GB/?ObjectPath=/Shops/BT3782/Categories/Prototyping__Boards

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Maybe try perf board if you're ready to make it look nice. Other wise 3-d printed parts or something of the like of a clamp or clip could be a quick and cheap solution.

Most breadboards already have double-sided tape on the underside such that you merely have to peel off the protective cover.

If not, you simply get some double-sided tape.

In general, you do not use breadboards in a final application but if it is convenient, use either stripboard or "protoboard" to mount the components in the same pattern by soldering. You then drill holes in the board and use stand-offs. Or you can even use the foam padded double sided tape.

Paul__B:
In general, you do not use breadboards in a final application but if it is convenient, use either stripboard or "protoboard" to mount the components in the same pattern by soldering. You then drill holes in the board and use stand-offs.

Very well put. The drilling holes is my personal preference because like a breadboard it is semi-permanent and won't leave you stuck as a final iteration if you aren't ready for that.

Hook and Loop fastener?

hot melt glue
RTV (silicone)

and a host of other adhesives

Highly recommended for keeping breadboards in place…

Of course, if you use Hook and Loop fastener, best known by its original patented manufacturer as "Velcro", you still have the problem of using an adhesive. Presumably Coding Badly's suggestion would be the highest quality of self-adhesive "Velcro", because the adhesives in many cheaper versions are not durable.

I have not deliberately tried to remove any Industrial Strength Velcro from the breadboards so I do not know how well it can be cleanly removed.

None of the Velcro has come off on its own.

I highly recommend the product.

If you wish to keep your project do not use bread board at all. Make it on strip board and solder all connections. You can not use solderless breadboard for a permanent project because it soon drops apart.

Yip, breadboard = intermittent connection problems

sorry for my mistake

Elecrow, that came over as aa pretty shameless and spurious attempt to plug your own product, great product though it is, I’m sure. But it seems to have a very tenuous relevance to the OP’s request. I resisted the urge to press “report to moderator” this time! I realise other well respected forum members do the same, but usually only when they see a truly relevant opportunity, and I don’t mind that.

Paul

1:1:
Yip, breadboard = intermittent connection problems

I had problems with a few loose wires just the other day. It was especially frustrating since every time my pot's middle wire disconnected, the analogRead() went to 0, and the map() sent my servo on a wild goose chase.

Yesterday I went and got one of these screw shields. Instead of breadboard I'll use connector strip like this for the time-being, then probably solder.

PaulRB:
Elecrow, that came over as aa pretty shameless and spurious attempt to plug your own product, great product though it is, I'm sure.

Problem with breadboarding the ESP8266 is its requirement for a sturdy 3.3V supply which the 3.3V on the standard Arduino cannot supply.

A breakout with a full (switchmode?) 3.3V converter from 5V and any necessary level conversion would seem to be very appropriate for a breadboard.

JimboZA:
I had problems with a few loose wires just the other day. It was especially frustrating since every time my pot's middle wire disconnected, the analogRead() went to 0, and the map() sent my servo on a wild goose chase.

uh huh, I can imagine! I once reverse engineered a crystal sync unit for 16mm cameras I had borrowed and had it working on a breadboard. Quite proud of myself realising that the part cost was under $5 (I learned it was just a PLL (phase locked loop)), whereas at the time the units themselves cost about $500.
Anyways, returned the sync unit but came home to discover the breadboard had ceased to operate as two wires had come loose, I had no idea where they had come from and luck/algorithic complexity was not on my side...
Ah well, at least it worked for half a day :slight_smile:

I've had a breadboard working for three years 24/7 without any problems. Sounds like I've been lucky. It was going to be temporary but I never got aroundtuit. And every time I think I'm done it turns out I'm not. It has been handy to make little changes.

Different board qualities?