Seeking what I need to push a button every 24 hours

I'm trying to make a project that pushes the thermostat button a few times, to turn up the heat every night after it gets cold.

So it needs to be battery powered, be able to push a button a few times, and have a programmable timer, so it does that every night.

Thank you so much for any help!

You need to post a wiring diagram to make us know a bit better.

I can't provide a wiring diagram. I hope I can still get some help.

I know how to code a bit, and already have an Arduino project finished.

What I'm trying to make now: A part that moves to press a button. Controlled by a timer and battery powered.

Here is an example of something like what I'd like to do: MicroBot Push

Thanks and happy holidays...

That is stone age technic. There must be a way to to this electrically instead of mechanically. Investigate what that "box" is sending out and use a relay to do the same.
Calculate the Ah, ampere hours, needed for each "push" and decide how many pushes You need.

I don't have the equipment for that, and I don't want to damage my thermostat. I don't have experience with electronics - just with software. I know I can take the cover off my thermostat, which exposes a bunch of electronics. Would it help to post a picture of that? Thank you!!

Edit: I guess I could buy the equipment you speak of... Should I post a picture of the circuitry?

Equipment for what? Calculating the need of battory power?
Give us a clue like what cables are comming out of the thermostate, what voltage in the system..
What is the output of the thermostate?

Well you said to measure the Ah, so I thought I would need some sort of gauge device to ascertain that.

Now that you bring it up, ya I don't know how much electricity I would be artificially putting into the system. I don't want to fry it...

Attached are pictures of the thermostat, with the cover on and off. Thanks for your help!

Can you access the pads on the PCB that the button makes contact with when it is pressed? Solder a wire to those two pads, and then have a relay make that connection. Will require a little soldering.

Or, build up a servo with an arm that can press the button for you.

Or, spend $20 and get a programmable thermostat
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Honeywell-Home-1-Week-Programmable-Thermostat-with-Digital-Display-RTH221B/203539508

Or, check with your heating supplier, see if they offer home energy assessments and provide free programmable thermostats.

Massachusetts offers free home assessments, in the past they came in, sealed around pipes going into the attic, did some other stuff, gave us free power strips and LED lightbulbs, seals to go under faceplates of wall outlets, etc.

jaketodd:
Well you said to measure the Ah, so I thought I would need some sort of gauge device to ascertain that.

Now that you bring it up, ya I don't know how much electricity I would be artificially putting into the system. I don't want to fry it...

Nol, I didn't ask You to measure, only use known facts and calculate the need of energy as Your idea looks like adding an external device to do things. That device needs power to perform several times as well as survive from one run to the next. Charging the batteries between attempts is a question You didn't rise.

Why not just program the thermostat with different temperature setpoints/schedule? It's programmable.

Back in the day I had something like this controlling a 5 or 10 watt resistor (in a small vented enclosure) which was placed under the thermostat to fake it out about the true room temperature. I was in an apartment and modifying building equipment was verboten. A nearby outlet, some appliance cord and a piece of double-sided sticky tape and you're in business.

OP wants to turn up the heat, so the resistor won’t help here…

a7

alto777:
OP wants to turn up the heat, so the resistor won’t help here…

Depends what the setpoint is.

jaketodd:
Well you said to measure the Ah, so I thought I would need some sort of gauge device to ascertain that.

Now that you bring it up, ya I don't know how much electricity I would be artificially putting into the system. I don't want to fry it...

Attached are pictures of the thermostat, with the cover on and off. Thanks for your help!

The third picture in Your original post that tells that options are available.
Read the manual and tell what the options are. There's a point to connect external control.

You guys can add me and this thread to the Biggest Fools of All Time category. It turns out it's programmable. Thank you all though, for coming to help.

I was wondering why it has batteries.

The original query regarding adding something battery powered seemed unnecessary insofar as the 24 VAC control power would be available for additional use at the back terminal strip and much more practical than mucking about with batteries to operate servo actuators and such.

Clearly it has the batteries as RTC backup instead of a CR2032 or supercap.

In some furnaces, the 24V is turned off & on tho. Battery with a relay to turn on the furnace is more reliable.

We found that out the hardway - woke up one night and the house was in the 80s! Power going on/off had messed up the thermostat. Went to battery powered with relay after that. Have had the same 2 Honeywell thermostats for 25 years now. Just need new batteries every couple of seasons.

look at servos. many come with different arms.
since you on need/want to push the button, you could make a unit that did that.

the thermostat can be programed for different temperatures, usually to reduce during the day when you are at work, then again when you are sleeping, warm just before you get home from work and just before you get out of bed. etc.

the batteries are to hold the program.

If the strokes of the buttons are short maybe solenoids could work.

which takes more power, solenoids or servo's ?