Selecting battery/driver

So I just wanna double check my work.

Right now, I'm building a robot, that will use 4 NEMA 17 motors (part number 17HS16-2004S), bluetooth module, maximum of two SG90 servo motors (most likely using one if designs doesn't work out), and RGB LEDs (total of 11 LEDs, each requiring 60mA per LED since it's a WS2812B).

The plan is to create a custom shield that will incorporate all the connections (drivers, motors, LED etc) along with a 5V regulator for the servos and LEDs.

I plan to use a 12V battery but I am unsure as to what mAh to use...So here's my attempt:

Each motor has 2A/phase, and since this is bipolar, that would be 4A per motor. Since there's four, that would be 16000mA total for steppers.

Each servo has a 700mA stall current, so multiply that by two to get 1400mA. Total mA with the LEDs (660mA) would be 18060mA. Now, I'm confused as to find the mAh (I know to multiply my total amps by hours I want it to run), since I don't know what's the normal runtime for something like this. 15min? 10min?

Also, which stepper driver would be the best for my case? drv8825 Is safest for me?

Datasheet https://www.omc-stepperonline.com/download/17HS16-2004S1.pdf

Edit: In terms of the drv8825 driver, since the continuous current/phase is 2.2a with heasink and the motor has 2A/phase, I would need to use the potentiometer to adjust the current to 1.1A if I wanted max current right? Seen in this video.

You would probably get sufficient accuracy just by considering the current draw for the stepper motors. By comparison the other loads will be small. Stepper motors are very inefficient and not really suited to battery power.

You need to post a link to the datasheet for the stepper motor so we can see how many watts they require. Many motors have low nominal voltages - for example 2 amps at 3v which means they would (in theory - without allowing for losses) only need 0.5 amps at 12v

A DRV8825 probably won't be able to provide 2 amps. 1.7 amps is a more typical maximum without overheating. If you really need the full torque from the motor you should use drivers that can provide 3 amps or more. It is never a good idea to run electronic equipment close to its limit.

...R
Stepper Motor Basics
Simple Stepper Code

Is this not the datasheet? I know it doesn't tell you the wattage but I looked around and I can't find any sheets that are different.

Why you need the wattage? I'm a little confused, would it tell me the minimum amps needed to run at 12V?

I don't need the full torque, and so right now (without knowing the information from above) I'm aiming to adjust the driver to use 1.5A and see how it performs.

Also, was my method for determining the max current draw of each stepper right (4A per motor)?

nominal1:
Is this not the datasheet? I know it doesn't tell you the wattage but I looked around and I can't find any sheets that are different.

What's the reason why you need the wattage? I'm a little confused. Would it tell me the minimum amps needed to run at 12V?

Sorry, I had not noticed that you had included the URL for the link earlier.

That PDF states 2 amps and 1.1 ohms which gives 4.4 watts ( I * I * R). You can also calculate the nominal voltage as 2 * 1.1 = 2.2v (I * R = V) and then calculate the watts as V * I = 2.2 * 2 = 4.4 watts. To get 4.4 watts from a 12v power supply you need 4.4 / 12 = 0.367 amps. This is all based on Ohm's law.

...R

Hmmm so do I only need to consider one coil on the motor then?

0.367 Amps tells me the minimum current the motor can handle then right? I.E Adjust the driver to allow 0.367A of current through the motor?

nominal1:
0.367 Amps tells me the minimum current the motor can handle then right? I.E Adjust the driver to allow 0.367A of current through the motor?

No. Absolutely not.

You should think of the combination of the driver and the stepper motor as a buck converter that changes 12v at 0.367 amps into 2.2v at 2 amps.

You were planning to adjust the driver for 1.5 amps - go with that.

...R