Send String Command through digital pin? is it possible?

Hello everyone.
I have this lock controller from Southco. It's called the Southco EA-A06-001 and it controls locks from Southco. The lock controller has a serial communication.

This lock controller is a USB controller, meaning I can open and close the lock using a computer. I use a software called YAT ( Yet Another Terminal) to open and close the locks that are connected to the lock controller.

The commands I send on the software (YAT) is a simple 'open1'(opens lock#1) 'close1'(closes lock#1)

My question is, is it possible to send the command through arduino? like send the string command 'open1' through one of the digital pins.

I'm very new to arduino programming so I don't have a lot of knowledge towards this and I'm not even sure if this is possible because I contacted Southco and they told me that since the Lock Controller is USB controlled I would need to open up the controller and wire an arduino after the FTDI chip? which i have no idea what it means btw.

I'm gonna need all the help i can get.

Thank you!

What baud rate?

The Southco EA-A06-001 uses USB. So you need a USB host shield.

I did a quick search but could not (quickly) find a link where people succeeded in using serial communication though an USB host shield; not said it can't be done.

Are you prepared to modify the Southco EA-A06-001? If so, open it up and take sharp photos and post here.

sterretje:
The Southco EA-A06-001 uses USB. So you need a USB host shield.

I did a quick search but could not (quickly) find a link where people succeeded in using serial communication though an USB host shield; not said it can't be done.

Are you prepared to modify the Southco EA-A06-001? If so, open it up and take sharp photos and post here.

Assuming I have a USB shield, how can I make the arduino send the command to the Lock Controller?
Which pin in the arduino can i use to send a string command to the lock controller?

and no I would prefer not to modify the lock controller.

So YAT sees the Southco USB device as a regular COM port? Then it is easy.

You must find the voltage used on the Southco serial. It is probably full RS232 voltage which uses both positive and negative signals. You will need a RS232 adapter or shield to generate that voltage. It may be 3.3V or 5V, which is called TTL. The Arduino can do that directly, maybe with 2 resistors if you need to drop a 5V Arduino output to 3.3V.

Then you need to know the baud rate.

If you have an Arduino with multiple hardware serial, then use one of the TX pins. If not, use the SoftwareSerial library and choose a pin.

MorganS:
So YAT sees the Southco USB device as a regular COM port? Then it is easy.
....
....

Now I am confused; it's a usb device, where does rs232 come into play?

A USB-to-serial converter can be a bare FTDI chip (or equivalent) with TTL level outputs. Or it may have RS232-level outputs where +12V is 'space' or 0 and -12V is 'mark' or 1.

If there is a 9-pin D-sub plug on the converter then it is almost certainly RS232.

I'm still confused; the Southco EA-A06-001 is a USB 'client', not a host.

Unless OP opens up the Southco EA-A06-001 and modifies it to expose the TX and RX to the Arduino, I can't see it work. Or if the OP uses a HOST shield and can program that to behave as a virtual serial port.